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Old 04-07-19, 10:25   #1
 
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Movies Hong Kong Withdraws Extradition Bill With China to Stop Protests

Britain Summons Chinese Ambassador as He Accuses UK Government of Taking 'Wrong Side' on Hong Kong

China's ambassador to the UK accused Britain of interfering over Hong Kong with a "colonial mindset" in a move that threatened to spark a major diplomatic crisis.

The Telegraph UK, 4 JULY 2019.- Roland Oliphant, Senior Foreign Correspondent, Sophia Yan, Hong Kong


Liu Xiaoming was summoned to the Foreign office after his comments amid a spiraling war of words over the handling of protests in the former British colony.

On Tuesday Jeremy Hunt warned China of “serious consequences” if it sought to use the disorder as a pretext for a mass crackdown on the protest movement.

In a press conference called on Wednesday, Mr Liu said that Britain should “seriously reflect on the consequences of its words and deeds with regard to Hong Kong”.

"I tell them: hands off Hong Kong and show respect. This colonial mindset is still haunting the minds of some officials or politicians," he said.



Summoned to the foreign office over the remarks, Liu Xiaoming was also asked to explain the “unacceptable and inaccurate” comments after a Chinese foreign ministry spokesman described UK requests that Beijing respect a deal guaranteeing the former colony's political freedoms as "basking in the faded glory of British colonialism".



Geng Shuang, a foreign ministry spokesman, said: "The UK considers itself as a guardian which is nothing but a delusion. It is just shameless to say that Hong Kong's freedoms are negotiated for them by the British side."

Tensions have risen since hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets of Hong Kong on Monday in the latest of a series of protests against a proposed law that would allow suspects in criminal cases to be extradited from Hong Kong to mainland China for the first time.

The demonstration turned violent when a hard core of demonstrators stormed Hong Kong’s Legislative Council building and clashed with riot police.

Mr Hunt said on Tuesday: “The UK signed an international binding legal agreement that enshrines the ‘one country, two systems rule,’ enshrines the basic freedoms of the people of Hong Kong, and we stand four square behind that agreement, four square behind the people of Hong Kong."

Hong Kong was under British rule for 155 years before it was handed back to China in 1997.

The handover was underpinned by a 1984 agreement between Margaret Thatcher and Chinese premier Deng Xiaoping that guaranteed protection for Hong Kong's unique British-influence political and legal system under a "one country, two systems" for at least 50 years.

Protesters say the extradition bill would undermine the city' state's common law legal system and allow Chinese authorities to hunt down and persecute dissidents.

Carrie Lam, Hong Kong's chief executive, has agreed to suspend the bill for the remaining session of the Legislative Council, but protesters want it withdrawn completely.

Hong Kong police on Wednesday evening arrested 13 people in connection with storming the parliament building.

Eight others were arrested for trying to steal and disclose personal information about police officers and inciting criminal activity online.

The city returned to normal Wednesday, and workers began repairing the many broken windows and removed protest signs that had covered the walls of the building for weeks.

But protesters described a growing sense of despair and said volunteers had been dispatched to dissuade demoralised demonstrators considering suicide.

Three people involved with the protest movement have taken their own lives in recent weeks.

“I’m quite certain this political crisis will continue, because the government has so far been completely inadequate in their response,” said Dennis Kwok, a pro-democracy lawmaker, told The Telegraph.

“We need to safeguard whatever freedom and rule of law there is in Hong Kong on an ongoing basis and to fight for democracy.”

Joshua Wong, a twice-jailed pro-democracy campaigner, said he was not involved with the group that took over the Legislative Council but said they had acted out of desperation.

“I understand their intentions and it’s hard to encourage anyone to take actions that might incur 10 years in jail terms.

“But I hope people can have more understanding. Two million people had already come out, but the government ignored them,” he wrote to his 221,000 followers on Twitter.
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Old 04-07-19, 14:16   #2
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Default re: Hong Kong Withdraws Extradition Bill With China to Stop Protests

They should have never given Hong Kong back to China, never ever. Of course we all make our mistakes and sometimes live to regret them....
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Old 12-08-19, 13:47   #3
 
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Asia Is China Closing Down ESCAPES From Hong Kong After Protests?

Hong Kong Airport Authority Cancels Flights over Protests

Hong Kong airport cancels ALL FLIGHTS due to a 5,000-strong demonstration after a female protester was shot in the eye by police as the city's carrier Cathay Pacific warns it will fire staff who support 'illegal protests'

  • China last week ordered Cathay Pacific to suspend certain staff because they 'pose a threat to aviation safety'
  • As a result, the airline suspended one pilot and two ground employees in relation to the on-going protests
  • Hong Kong's airport and streets witnessed another weekend of violent clashes between activists and police
  • Local media released footage of police firing bean bag rounds and beating protesters with baton in a station
  • One female protester faces losing her right eye after allegedly being shot in the face with a bean bag round
  • The incident has sparked more anger among protesters who have staged a new rally at the airport today
  • All remaining flights out of Hong Kong today have been cancelled as protesters occupy terminal buildings
  • The city's police today showed off an anti-riot water cannon that could soon be used on demonstrators
  • China today slammed violent Hong Kong protests as 'terrorism' and said the city was at a critical juncture

The Guardian UK, 12 Aug 2019.





All remaining flights out of Hong Kong International Airport on Monday have been cancelled after protesters swarmed to a terminal building to stage a sit-in. Pictured, demonstrators surround banners that read: 'Those charge to the street on today is brave!' (centre top) and 'Release all the detainees!' during the peaceful rally at the arrival hall of the airport today





Hundreds of Hong Kong protesters have started three days of rallies at the city's busy airport since Friday. The city's streets witnessed another weekend of violent clashes between activists and police. One female demonstrator faces losing her eye after being hit by a bean bag round by the police in Tsim Sha Tsui on Sunday. The incident has sparked more anger in public





A protester covers her one eye with a gauze during the mass demonstration at Hong Kong International Airport today after news of a woman shot in the eye during a protest shocked the financial hub. Pro-democracy leaders were calling for as many as one million people to head to the Hong Kong airport today after 40 people were injured across the city over the weekend



Hong Kong’s airport authority has cancelled departure flights after thousands of pro-democracy demonstrators flooded into one of the world’s busiest air travel hubs holding signs reading “Hong Kong is not safe” and “Shame on police”.

Roads to the airport were congested and car park spaces were full, the authority said, on the fourth day of a mass demonstration there.

“Other than departure flights that have completed the check-in process and the arrival flights already heading to Hong Kong, all other flights have been cancelled for the rest of today,” a statement said.

The abrupt shutdown came as street protests across the Chinese territory entered their 10th week with no sign of either side backing down, and the Chinese government signalled its rising anger at the protesters, denouncing some of the violent demonstrations as “terrorism”.

Rights groups and democracy activists accused police of using excessive force after teargas was fired into an enclosed subway station and officers posed as protesters before making arrests during an intense weekend of clashes.

Dressed in their uniform black T-shirts and masks, protesters at the airport handed out lists to arriving visitors documenting alleged police violence, and held up graphic images of injured protesters. Many wore eye patches in reference to a female protester who sustained an eye injury.

“I just don’t understand how people can tolerate that kind of police brutality. I feel like if I don’t come out now, I can’t come out ever,” said Hilary Lo, who took a half day’s sick leave from her accountancy firm to attend the demonstration. “People are starting to realise the police are out of control, especially with what has happened in the past two weeks.”

Some of the 5,000 activists occupying the airport’s arrivals hall went to the departure area and caused disruptions, Hong Kong police told a news conference. Police declined to say if they would move to clear the demonstrators.

This summer’s increasingly violent demonstrations have plunged the Chinese-ruled territory into its most serious crisis in decades, presenting one of the biggest challenges to China’s leader, Xi Jinping, since he came to power in 2012.

Yang Guang, a spokesman for the Hong Kong and Macao Affairs Office of the State Council, said: “Hong Kong’s radical demonstrators have repeatedly used extremely dangerous tools to attack police officers, which already constitutes a serious violent crime, and also shows the first signs of terrorism emerging. This wantonly tramples on Hong Kong’s rule of law and social order.”

In an apparent warning to protesters of a toughening approach on the part of authorities, Hong Kong police invited legislators and journalists on Monday to witness a display of water cannon.

Police have never used the device since two were bought after pro-democracy protests in 2014, but during Monday’s demonstration one was blasted at dummy targets in a training facility.

Last week Amnesty International said the deployment of water cannon could lead to serious injuries if misused in confined spaces. Man-Kei Tam, the director of the rights group’s Hong Kong division, said clashes between protesters and police had “escalated to another level, especially on the police side”.

An anti-riot vehicle equipped with water cannon sprays water on a dummy during a demonstration in Hong Kong on Monday. Photograph: Kin Cheung/AP

Tam cited footage of police firing teargas into a subway station in Kwai Fong on Sunday night. It was not clear how many protesters were in the station but it was rare for officers to fire teargas indoors. He also shared a video of police firing non-lethal projectiles at close range as protesters attempted to flee down an escalator at another subway station.

The police have also reported injuries among their ranks, including eye irritation from laser pointers and petrol bomb burns.

Civil Rights Observer, a local rights group that sends observers to protests, said it had serious concerns about police violence and had seen “clear evidence to show the police are violating their guidelines”, according to its spokesman, Icarus Wong Ho-yin.

During the protests at the weekend, the Hong Kong Free Press news website posted footage of one arrest that appeared to show officers dressed as protesters with an demonstrator who was pressed to the ground. The young man, who said his name was Chow Ka-lok and asked for a lawyer, sustained head wounds and a broken tooth.

Protests in Hong Kong began in early June against a legislative bill that would have allowed for residents to stand trial in mainland China on criminal charges. While the territory returned to Chinese rule in 1997, it was promised semi-autonomy for 50 years including a separate legal system. Many protesters feared the bill, now suspended, would have led to the decline of civil and political rights in the Asian financial hub.


Quote:

Why are People Protesting?


The protests were triggered by a controversial bill that would have allowed extraditions to mainland CHINA, where the Communist party controls the courts, but have since evolved into a broader pro-democracy movement.
Public anger – fuelled by the aggressive tactics used by the police against demonstrators – has collided with years of frustration over worsening inequality and the cost of living in one of the world's most expensive, densely populated cities.
The protest movement was given fresh impetus on 21 July when gangs of men attacked protesters and commuters at a mass transit station – while authorities seemingly did little to intervene.
Underlying the movement is a push for full democracy in the city, whose leader is chosen by a committee dominated by a pro-Beijing establishment rather than by direct elections.

Protesters have vowed to keep their movement going until their core demands are met, such as the resignation of the city's leader, Carrie Lam, an independent inquiry into police tactics, an amnesty for those arrested and a permanent withdrawal of the bill.


Why Were People so Angry About The Extradition Bill?

Hongkongers have seen Beijing’s influence grow in recent years, as activists have been jailed and pro-democracy lawmakers disqualified from running or holding office. Independent booksellers have disappeared from the city, before reappearing in mainland China facing charges.
Under the terms of the agreement by which the former British colony was returned to Chinese control in 1997, the semi-autonomous region was meant to maintain a “high degree of autonomy” through an independent judiciary, a free press and an open market economy, a framework known as “one country, two systems”.
The extradition bill was seen as an attempt to undermine this and to give Beijing the ability to try pro-democracy activists under the judicial system of the mainland.


How Have The Authorities Responded?

Lam has shown no sign of backing down beyond agreeing to suspend the extradition bill, while Beijing has issued increasingly shrill condemnations but has left it to the city's semi-autonomous government to deal with the situation. Meanwhile police have violently clashed directly with protesters, repeatedly firing teargas and rubber bullets.
Beijing has ramped up its accusations that foreign countries are “fanning the fire” of unrest in the city. China’s top diplomat Yang Jiechi has ordered the US to “immediately stop interfering in Hong Kong affairs in any form”.
.

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Old 04-09-19, 12:48   #4
 
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Update Re: Hong Kong Withdraws Extradition Bill With China to Stop Protests

Hong Kong: Lam Withdraws Extradition Bill That Sparked Months-Long Protests

Embattled chief executive makes announcement on Wednesday after meeting allies

The Guardian UK, 4 Sep 2019.


Hong Kong’s leader Carrie Lam formally withdrew an extradition bill on Wednesday that has sparked month of protests and plunged the territory into its biggest political crisis in decades.





In a five-minute television address, the chief executive said: “The government will formally withdraw the bill in order to fully allay public concerns.”

Lam said her government would introduce measures to address the cause of the last three months of mass protests, including appointing two new members of a police watchdog agency, holding a series of dialogues, and investigating social problems.

“From this month, I and my principal officials will reach out to the community to start a direct dialogue,” she said. “People from all walks of life, with different views and backgrounds are invited to share their views and air their grievances.”

The bill would have allowed the extradition of suspects to mainland China’s opaque legal system. The protests it sparked have since turned into a broader democracy movement that has challenged Beijing’s authority over the semi-autonomous Chinese territory.

Lam shelved the bill in June and in July again insisted it was “dead” after weeks of protest but until now refused to withdraw it entirely, a key demand of protesters who argued it could be revived again if not formally withdrawn.

Since early June, Hong Kong has been embroiled in its worst political crisis since the former British colony was returned to Chinese control in 1997. A day after Lam suspended the bill in June, an estimated two million people took to the streets to call for its full withdrawal.

Since then, the city has been rocked by protests every weekend as relations between protesters, many of them students, residents and the police have grown increasingly fraught. The protesters’ demands have expanded to include an independent inquiry, an amnesty to those arrested, and democratic reforms.

In her short statement on Wednesday, Lam did not address the other demands and said she did not believe the government should establish an independent investigation committee to probe police behaviour over the course of the protests, among the most important to demands to demonstrators.

Lam said: “The government believes the actions of the police should be dealt with by dedicated department that investigates the police.”

And she said the government would continue to punish protesters. “Violence has shaken the foundation of the rule of law and has pushed Hong Kong to a dangerous situation,” she said said. “No matter how dissatisfied people are, violence is not the solution. There is an urgency to suppress violence and to seriously enforce the law.”

By formally withdrawing the bill, Lam conceded to one of five key demands of the demonstrators, in an effort to de-escalate protest that have become increasingly violent on both sides. Lam met pro-establishment lawmakers in the afternoon, according to the South China Morning Post, before making her announcement.

In recent weeks, clashes between police and protesters have becoming increasingly violent. At the weekend, protesters and police clashed in some of the worst confrontations of the last three months as protesters threw 100 petrol bombs at police and government buildings.

The Hong Kong police deployed water cannon and fired multiple rounds of rubber bullets and teargas. Police were also seen chasing down and beating passengers in metro stations. More than 1,000 people have been arrested.

Earlier this week, Reuters published a recording of Lam speaking to a group of business executives in which she said she would step down if she were able to – suggesting Beijing has forced her to remain in office.


On Tuesday, however, Lam told reporters she wanted to remain in office to see Hong Kong through such a difficult period.

The withdrawal, while a major concession by the government, may still be too little, too late. As news of the coming withdrawal spread on Wednesday, riot police were seen patrolling metro stations as some protesters called for people to gather at different stations.

“That alone is not going to be enough to satisfy an angry and frustrated public. The nature of the protest movement has transformed over the last 13 weeks,” said Adam Ni, a researcher at Macquarie University in Sydney. “If she does not take further steps, then we can expect the protests to continue,” he said.

Protesters took to LIHKG, the online forum where they have been organising, to criticise Lam. One popular comment read: “What’s the difference between withdrawal of the bill on June 8 and September 4th? … three eyes … eight dead, more than 100 prosecuted, more than 1,000 arrested, countless wounded, and the injustice of the entire system and the police has been exposed.”





Read More;

Hong Kong on brink of recession as protests and trade war take toll

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/sep/04/hong-kong-on-brink-of-recession-as-protests-and-trade-war-take-toll
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