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Old 05-12-14, 13:27   #1
 
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Update VIDEOs-Typhoon Hagupit Slams Islands>1 Mill+ Evacuated=Aid Agencies Move in

Tens of Thousands Flee their Homes in Terror as 150mph Typhoon 'Smash' Bears Down on Philippines
  • Thousands flee coastal villages and landslide zones as 150mph Typhoon Hagupit is set to strike the Philippines
  • The capital Manila, where 12 million people live, could be in the firing line, the U.S. military warned last night
  • Families with young children and babies take refuge in churches and sports stadiums as the storm approaches
  • Ports close across the nation and flights are cancelled as the country braces itself for Pacific typhoon to arrive
  • Hagupit, Filipino for 'smash', is expected to make landfall on the eastern coast of the Philippines late tomorrow
  • Huge storm comes just a year after Typhoon Haiyan claimed the lives of more than 7,000 people in the Philippines


Tens of thousands of people have fled their homes in the Philippines as the nation braces itself for a second devastating typhoon in just over a year.

Typhoon Hagupit, Filipino for 'smash', is expected to batter swathes of the nation with 150mph winds tomorrow, including the densely populated capital Manila, with millions of people in the firing line.
Coastal villages and areas prone to landslides were left deserted as people made their way to safer land, just over a year after Typhoon Haiyan claimed 7,000 lives.





Typhoon Hagupit, with winds of up to 150mph, is expected to strike the eastern coast of the Philippines late tomorrow, just over a year after Typhoon Haiyan claimed the lives of more than 7,000 people




Families sought refuge in churches, town halls and sports stadiums as the typhoon closed in, with Filipinos better prepared for the storm than last year




Coastal villages and areas prone to landslides were left deserted as people made their way to safe zones, such as Tacloban city (pictured)




Children and babies, such as two-month-old Ivan Lecciones (pictured), took shelter in a temporary evacuation centre in a church




A woman prays with rosaries inside a makeshift evacuation centre as the Philippines braces for Typhoon Hagupit to strike


Families with young children and babies were seen taking cover in churches, town halls and sports stadiums today as they prepared for Hagupit to arrive, fearing it could wreak as much havoc as Haiyan, which destroyed a million homes and displaced more than four million last November.
Hagupit, Filipino for 'smash', is expected to make landfall on the eastern coast of the Pacific nation late on Saturday, but the U.S, military believe it may veer north and threaten Manila - where 12 million people live.

More than 2,000 people were left stranded in the city as ports closed across the nation. Some Philippine Airlines and Cebu Pacific flights in the south of the nation were shut as the storm closed in.
Mayor of Manila Joseph Estrada said: 'We have alerted the people of Manila and we're ready. These typhoons change direction all the time.'





Forecasts show the typhoon is expected to travel across central Philippines, with some suggesting it could veer north towards Manila





Families left their homes behind, in the knowledge that last year's typhoon destroyed a million house and left four million people displaced





Thousands were left stranded as ports closed across the nation, with flights in the south of the nation also cancelled as the storm approached




Armed policemen stood guard outside a shopping centre in an attempt to stop people from panic-buying in the lead up to tomorrow's typhoon





Shelves began to empty as residents of Tacloban city, where thousands of people have been evacuated, stocked up on supplies





An elderly woman sits while other family members gather their belongings as they arrive at a stadium to seek refuge




Quote:
WHY IS THE PHILIPPINES STRUCK BY TYPHOONS SO OFTEN?
Dr Steven Godby, expert in natural hazards at Nottingham Trent University, said: 'No other country is struck by as many tropical cyclones each year as the Philippines.
'For these storms to form, warm sea surface temperatures of at least 26C are needed and these conditions are found in the western parts of the main ocean basins, away from cold water currents.
'Isolated island groups like the Philippines are particularly vulnerable to tropical cyclones.'
Hagupit is forecast to tear through central Philippines along the same route where Haiyan levelled villages and left more than 7,300 dead or missing.
The typhoon, which currently lies more than 250 miles east of the Philippines, strengthened overnight as gusts intensified to 155mph.
In Manila, President Benigno Aquino yesterday led an emergency meeting of disaster-response agencies.

The government put the military on full alert, workers opened evacuation centers and transported food packs, medicines and body bags to far-flung villages, which could be cut off by heavy rains.
The Philippines appears to have learned lessons from last year's devastation, evacuating thousands to safer areas, including the eastern city of Tacloban, where the typhoon has triggered panic-buying in shops and petrol stations.

Joho Moro, a 42-year-old businessman whose wife, daughter and mother were killed in Tacloban by Haiyan last year, said: 'I'm scared. I'm praying to God not to let another disaster strike us again. We haven't recovered from the first.'
He added that he had stocked up on essential supplies and water in preparation for the storm.





Workers fold a billboard sign in anticipation of strong winds brought by Typhoon Hagupit on a coastal road in Cavite City, south of Manila






A stranded cargo ship washed ashore in Anibong village, near Tacloban, after Typhoon Haiyan last year awaits another battering





Children carried their belongings and each other as they made their way to safe areas, passing another ship left stranded after last year's devastation





Widow Ginalyn Edca holds a picture of her husband who was killed by Haiyan as she makes a way to an evacuation centre






Alexander Pama, chief of the National Disaster Risk Reduction Management Council, points to a satellite image of Typhoon Hagupit which is brewing over the Pacific Ocean





Children played outside their homes as they awaited evacuation from a slum in Manila earlier this morning


Hundreds of people still living in tents following Haiyan, known as Yolanda in the Philippines, were among the first to be relocated to safe zones in Tacloban, which has run out of hotel rooms as wealthier families booked ahead for the weekend.

Rita Villadolid, a 39-year-old taking refuge inside a stadium said: 'We've learned our lesson from Yolanda. Everyone here is gripped with fear.'

Disaster response official Blanche Gobenciong said nearly 12,000 residents in Tacloban, where entire settlements were wiped out by the storm, have so far been moved from high-risk villages to emergency shelters.
She said:

'We've not heard of villagers resisting to be evacuated. Their trauma is still so fresh.
'We have a zero-casualty target. Just one loss of life will really sadden us all and make us wonder what went wrong.'

The typhoon was downgraded to a category 4 today, a level below a 'super typhoon', with hopes it may weaken to winds of around 108mph by the time it strikes tomorrow.


MORE;


Differing Forecasts Widen Scope of Typhoon Hagupit

AP, 5 December 2014


MANILA, Philippines (AP) — A ferocious and dangerously erratic typhoon blew closer to the Philippines Friday, as differing forecasts about its path — one predicting it will graze the capital Manila — prompted a much wider swath of the country to prepare for a weekend of destructive winds and rain.


Typhoon Hagupit —Filipino for "Smash" — was expected to blast in from the Pacific Ocean into central Philippines late Saturday, lashing parts of a region that was devastated by last year's Typhoon Haiyan and left more than 7,300 people dead and missing. Still, the good news was that the typhoon was weakening as it blew closer to the coast.



"I'm scared," said Haiyan survivor Jojo Moro. "I'm praying to God not to let another disaster strike us again. We haven't recovered from the first."





Fishermen tow their fishing boat to a drier area after a day's work Friday, Dec. 5, 2014 off Manila Bay in Manila, Philippines. A wide swath of the Philippines, including the capital Manila, braced Friday for a dangerously erratic and powerful typhoon approaching from the Pacific, about a year after the country was lashed by Typhoon Haiyan that left more than 7,300 people dead. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)



The 42-year-old businessman who lost his wife, daughter and mother last year in central Tacloban city, said he stocked up on sardines, instant noodles, eggs and water.

At least 47 of the country's 81 provinces are considered potentially at high risk from Hagupit, officials said. The first one in its path is the Eastern Samar province where it will make landfall. It is then expected to cut across central islands along a route north. But its path thereafter is debatable.

The computer models of the two agencies tracking the typhoon closely — the U.S. military's Joint Typhoon Warning Center in Hawaii and the Philippine weather agency — showed different tracks for the typhoon.
The U.S. agency said Hagupit (pronounced HA'-goo-pit) may veer north after coming inland and sweep past the southern edge of the capital Manila, a city of more than 12 million people. The Philippine agency, known by its acronym PAGASA, projected a more southern track. But both tracks appeared to be coming closer together as the landfall time approaches.
Also, both agencies said the typhoon is slowly losing strength. PAGASA said it is now packing winds of 195 kilometers (121 miles) per hour and gusts of 230 kph (143 mph). The U.S. center in Hawaii downgraded the typhoon's status from a super typhoon and said it was expected to continue losing strength with winds dropping to 175 kph (108 mph) by Sunday morning.

"Although it's been reported that the typhoon has lost strength, it doesn't mean that our readiness will also weaken," said Alexander Pama, who heads the country's disaster-response agency.

Haunted by the country's ordeal with Haiyan, which caught people unprepared to deal with its ferocity, authorities and villagers seemed readier this time to respond to the impending crisis.
Dozens of domestic flights were canceled and inter-island ferry services were suspended.

In Tacloban, the central city where Haiyan's tsunami-like storm surges left thousands dead and wiped out entire villages, and in outlying provinces, tens of thousands of residents have been moved from high-risk villages to emergency shelters.

"We've not heard of villagers resisting to be evacuated," regional disaster-response director Blanche Gobenciong said. "Their trauma is still so fresh."
Gobenciong said the unpredictable path of the typhoon made it harder to ascertain which areas would be hit.
"We have a zero-casualty target," she said. "Just one loss of life will really sadden us all and make us wonder what went wrong."
"We have alerted the people of Manila and we're ready,"

Hagupit's erratic behavior prompted the government to call an emergency meeting of mayors of metropolitan Manila. Defense Secretary Voltaire Gazmin said he'd rather "over-prepare than under-prepare."

Manila Mayor Joseph Estrada said that authorities have alerted residents. "We are ready," he said, but pointed out that "these typhoons change direction all the time."

Haiyan demolished about 1 million houses and displaced some 4 million people in the central Philippines. Hundreds of residents still living in tents in Tacloban have been prioritized in the ongoing evacuation.

Dr Steven Godby, an expert in natural hazards at Nottingham Trent University in Nottingham, said the Philippines experiences five to 10 cyclones a year on an average, the most hitting any country.
He said the right oceanic conditions to create deadly typhoons "come together in the western Pacific and put the Philippines in the firing line as a result."
Cyclones also need a force "to give them an initial rotation and this is provided by the spin of the Earth through the Coriolis force, but in a narrow 'sweet spot' of between 5-12o north and south of the equator," he said.
"Isolated island groups like the Philippines are particularly vulnerable to tropical cyclones and the threats come from the high winds, storm surge and heavy rains these storms bring," he said.





This image made available by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and captured by the Suomi NPP satellite's VIIRS instrument shows Typhoon Hagupit on Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014, as it approaches the Philippines. Villagers are fleeing coastal towns in the central Philippines as the advancing storm evokes memories of last year's deadly typhoon. Forecasters say Typhoon Hagupit may hit some of the same places devastated by Haiyan in 2013. (AP Photo/NOAA)





A soldier watches as workers unload sacks of rice supplies which are intended for typhoon evacuees Friday, Dec. 5, 2014 in Tacloban city, Leyte province in central Philippines. A wide swath of the Philippines, including the capital Manila, braced Friday for a dangerously erratic and powerful typhoon approaching from the Pacific, about a year after the country was lashed by Typhoon Haiyan that left more than 7,300 people dead. (AP Photo)






Informal settlers while away their time on a breakwater as they go on their daily business despite a looming typhoon which is forecast to affect Manila in the next few days Friday, Dec. 5, 2014 off Manila Bay in Manila, Philippines. A wide swath of the Philippines, including the capital Manila, braced Friday for a dangerously erratic and powerful typhoon approaching from the Pacific, about a year after the country was lashed by Typhoon Haiyan that left more than 7,300 people dead. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)






Teresita Pison lines up to dry her daily catch as she goes on her daily business despite a looming typhoon which is forecast to affect Manila in the next few days Friday, Dec. 5, 2014 off Manila Bay in Manila, Philippines. A wide swath of the Philippines, including the capital Manila, braced Friday for a dangerously erratic and powerful typhoon approaching from the Pacific, about a year after the country was lashed by Typhoon Haiyan that left more than 7,300 people dead. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)
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Old 06-12-14, 17:38   #2
 
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Update re: VIDEOs-Typhoon Hagupit Slams Islands>1 Mill+ Evacuated=Aid Agencies Move in

Typhoon Slams into Philippines, 1 Million+ Evacuated

By Rosemarie Francisco, MANILA, Dec 6 (Reuters) -


A powerful typhoon roared into the eastern Philippines today, Saturday, bringing lashing rain and strong winds that felled trees, ripped off tin roofs and toppled power lines in areas still bearing the scars of a super typhoon 13 months ago.


About 1 million people had already fled to shelters by the time Typhoon Hagupit made landfall, in what a U.N. agency said was one of the world's biggest peacetime evacuations.


As the storm barrelled in from the Pacific, power was cut across most of the central island of Samar and nearby Leyte province, including Tacloban City, considered ground zero of the devastating super typhoon Haiyan last year.

"The wind is blowing so strongly, it's like it is whirling," Mabel Evardone, an official of the coastal town of Sulat in Eastern Samar, said on local radio. "The waters have risen now."

There was no word of any casualties.

Hagupit had weakened to a category 3 storm, two notches below "Super Typhoon", but could still unleash huge destruction with torrential rain and potentially disastrous storm surges of up to 4.5 metres (15 ft), the weather bureau PAGASA said.

The eye of the typhoon hit the town of Dolores, Eastern Samar at 9:15 p.m. (1315 GMT), PAGASA said, adding the storm maintained its strength, with winds of up to 175 kph (110 mph) near the centre and gusts of up to 210 kph (130 mph).

"We can expect that heavy rains were dumped on Eastern Samar because Ruby hovered for a long time over the coastal areas," weather forecaster Jori Loiz said on radio, referring to the local name of typhoon Hagupit.

The weather bureau said Hagupit - which means "lash" in Filipino - maintained its projected path towards Masbate, Romblon and Oriental Mindoro provinces, slightly north of areas devastated by super typhoon Haiyan last year.
PAGASA earlier said the storm was moving north northwest at 16 kph (10 mph).

"Ruby's lashing will be severe," Interior Secretary Manuel Roxas told government radio. "Let's be alert. Let's evacuate to prevent any harm to your families."

Philippine Airlines and Cebu Pacific cancelled about 100 flights to central and southern Philippines on Saturday.

Residents of low-lying villages and landslide-prone areas have fled to schools, civic centres, town halls, gyms and churches, the national disaster agency said.

"We received reports about a million+ people evacuating already. There is increased awareness to make early action and co-operate and do pre-emptive evacuation," Gwendolyn Pang, secretary general of the Philippine Red Cross, said in a television interview.

At least 50 municipalities in the central Philippines and the southern part of the country's main Luzon island were at risk of storm surges, the Science and Technology department said.

The typhoon was unlikely to hit the capital Manila, home to around 12 million people, the agency said.

"Typhoon Hagupit is triggering one of the largest evacuations we have ever seen in peacetime," said Denis McClean, spokesman of the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction in Geneva.

Relief agency Refugees International said in a statement it was "deeply concerned" that evacuation centres may not be safe.

"A damage assessment of designated evacuation centres in typhoon-affected areas indicated that in some places - such as Eastern Samar, where Hagupit is headed - less than 10 percent of evacuation centres were likely to withstand future typhoons," the group said.


LESSONS LEARNED



The United States had offered to send nine C-130 transport aircraft, three P-3C Orion, and medical and relief workers, said Major Emmanuel Garcia, commander of the Armed Forces' 7th civil relations group.
Other foreign governments also sent word they were ready to help the disaster-prone Southeast Asian nation, he said.

The islands of Samar and Leyte were worst-hit by 250 kph (155 mph) winds and storm surges brought by Typhoon Haiyan in November.

"There has been a tremendous amount of learning from last year," said Greg Matthews, emergency response advisor at the International Rescue Committee. "There have been reports from our field officers and partners that people are evacuating themselves. They are aware of the situation."

Haiyan, one of the strongest typhoons ever to make landfall, left more than 7,000 dead or missing and more than 4 million homeless or with damaged houses. About 25,000 people in Eastern Samar and Leyte still live in tents, shelters and bunkhouses.

International humanitarian agencies and non-government groups, which have been supporting Haiyan-devastated communities in the central Philippines, are preparing to mobilize aid and relief efforts in the aftermath of Typhoon Hagupit.

Soldiers were deployed to urban centres, particularly in Tacloban City, where widespread looting broke out after Haiyan.

"The soldiers will help our police counterparts in maintaining peace and order, and prevent looting incidents," said Colonel Restituto Padilla Jr, armed forces spokesman.


MORE:


As the storm made landfall, power was cut across Samar and Leyte islands, which bore the brunt of Super Typhoon Haiyan on November 8 last year. That storm killed 7300 people and displaced 4.1 million others.
Winds in excess of 120km/h hit Tacloban, the capital of Leyte that was considered Haiyan's ground zero.

"The wind is blowing so strongly, it's like it is whirling," Mabel Evardone, an official of the coastal town of Sulat in Eastern Samar said on local radio.




A girl walks along the shore as strong waves from Typhoon Hagupit begin to hit Atimonan in the eastern Philippines. Photo: AP


"The waters have risen now."



Families crowded into churches, schools and other makeshift evacuation centres across the islands of Samar, Leyte and Cebu in what relief officials described as one the country's largest peacetime evacuations.
Hagupit had weakened to a category 3 storm as it moved across the Pacific on Friday and early Saturday, well below "super typhoon" category.




Filipino families seek refuge at a school used as an evacuation centre. Photo: AP


But experts warned it is still the strongest storm to hit the Philippines this year and would bring hugely destructive winds and storm surges up to 4.5 metres.
Hagupit – Filipino for lash – packed wind gusts of up to 240km/h and a thunderstorm 15 kilometres tall sat at its centre as it tracked towards the Philippines.


The storm has a giant front of more than 600 kilometres.






A satellite image of Typhoon Hagupit over the Philippines late on Saturday. Photo: NASA


Learning the lessons of Haiyan, towns in Hagupit's projected path boarded up homes and shops and stacked sandbags.

"The people themselves are preparing and do not think twice about leaving their homes. They know what to do," said Social Welfare Secretary Dinky Soliman.

Weather forecasters expect Hagupit – called Ruby locally – to move more than 800 kilometres north-west after making landfall in Eastern Samar province, through 47 of the country's 81 provinces. It could reach as far as Manila, a city of more than 12 million people, many of whom live in low-lying areas vulnerable to severe flooding.

Airlines have cancelled almost 200 flights to central and southern Philippines as ports shut and sea travel was suspended.


Relief agencies said the extent of initial damage caused by Hagupit would not be known until daylight breaks on Sunday.

Scientists say unusually strong storms to hit the Philippines in recent years are linked to climate change.


The country endures an average of 20 typhoons a year.


Forecast: Increasing Danger for Philippines





Hagupit Forecast Path





PAGASA has issued public storm warning signals for 36 geographic areas, spanning from southeastern portions of Luzon (the main northern island) through the Visayas (central Philippines) and northeastern parts of Mindanao (the main southern island).



The island of Samar in the Visayas nearest the initial arrival of the landfall was raised to Public Storm Warning Signal No. 3, meaning winds of 100-185 kph (62 to 115 mph) are expected "in at least 18 hours."

PAGASA also placed a large part of this region in Public Storm Warning Signal No. 2, meaning 61 to 100 kph (38 to 62 mph) are possible "in at least 24 hours." Metro Cebu, the second-largest metropolitan area in the country after Metro Manila, is included in Public Storm Warning Signal No. 2.

First, the typhoon is expected to approach the eastern shores of the central Philippines (Eastern Visayas Region) on Saturday evening local time (Saturday morning U.S. time).

While it still remains a bit uncertain whether the center of Hagupit will technically "make landfall", the most intense eyewall winds will arrive in Samar Island (particularly northern and eastern parts of the island), and perhaps also affecting northern Leyte Island (including Tacloban City) Saturday evening, continuing into Sunday, local time.

During this initial period of contact with land, Hagupit will likely unleash its most powerful winds. It should be at least a Category 4 equivalent tropical cyclone by that time, but may possibly be a Category 5 storm.

In areas where the wind blows onshore, dangerous storm surge is likely. Philippine officials have issued storm surge advisories for a number of communities at risk. Some communities on the islands of Samar and Leyte are at risk of storm surge up to 4 meters (13 feet) according to the alerts, equivalent to the height of a one-story home.


Model Rainfall Forecast





As Hagupit grinds west-northwest across the Philippines, the danger will gradually transition from one of wind damage and storm surge to one of heavy rainfall.



Again, there is some uncertainty in Hagupit's path and forward speed, but in general its center should move in the general direction of Metro Manila. The process is expected to be agonizingly slow -- potentially taking 48-72 hours to move from the eastern Philippines to Metro Manila.

We expect Hagupit's winds to have weakened considerably upon nearing Manila, however, some downed trees/tree limbs, power outages, and structural damage is still possible, there, Monday.

In general, a tropical cyclone's rainfall potential depends on how slowly it moves, not its intensity. Hagupit will be moving along very slowly over an area with rugged terrain. As a result, rainfall totals could be extraordinarily high -- locally exceeding 2 feet -- leading to landslides, debris flows, and life-threatening flash floods.

Just three years ago in December 2011, Tropical Storm Washi (Sendong) dumped tremendous rainfall on the island of Mindanao, causing massive floods that killed 1,268 people. Winnie was only of tropical depression strength when it triggered deadly flooding in late Nov. 2004.


Over the past 10 years, six separate tropical cyclones have claimed over 1,000 lives in the Philippines, including:


Quote:
- Haiyan/Yolanda Nov. 2013: Over 7,300 killed (AP)
- Bopha/Pablo Dec. 2012: 1,901 killed
- Washi/Sendong Dec. 2011: 1,268 killed
- Fengshen/Frank Jun. 2008: 1,410 killed
- Durian/Reming Nov./Dec. 2006: 1,399 killed
- Winnie Nov. 2004: 1,593 killed



Pray for those poor people folks, many have not recovered from the last Typhoon -Ladybbird

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