Go Back   DreamTeamDownloads1, FTP Help, Movies, Bollywood, Applications, etc. & Mature Sex Forum, Rapidshare, Filefactory, Freakshare, Rapidgator, Turbobit, & More MULTI Filehosts > World News/Sport/Weather > Other Interesting News

Other Interesting News Other News That is Not on World Events

IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT
Hallo to All Members. As you can see we regularly Upgrade our Servers, (Sorry for any Downtime during this). We also have added more Forums to help you with many things and for you to enjoy. We now need you to help us to keep this site up and running. This site works at a loss every month and we appeal to you to donate what you can. If you would like to help us, then please just send a message to any Member of Staff for info on how to do this,,,, & Thank You for Being Members of this site.
Post New ThreadReply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 24-04-15, 14:15   #1
 
Ladybbird's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 35,155
Thanks: 23,729
Thanked 12,742 Times in 8,576 Posts
Ladybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond repute

Awards Showcase
Best Admin Best Admin Gold Medal Gold Medal 
Total Awards: 6

Movies FULL MOVIE/PhOtOs-World Remembers Gallipoli-100 Yrs on

World Leaders Mark the 100th Anniversary of the Disastrous Gallipoli Landings Which Claimed 140,000 Lives During World War One
  • Two days of ceremonies planned on Gallipoli peninsula to honour victims of British-led invasion on April 25, 1915
  • Attended by leaders of World War I allies including Australia PM, New Zealand Premier, Prince Charles and Harry
  • Fallen from both the Ottoman and Allied sides lie close together in separate cemeteries on western edge of Turkey
  • Around 58,000 Allied troops and 87,000 Turks died during botched attempt to knock Ottoman Empire out of the war
Daily Mail UK, 24 April 2015






Australia's defence chief Air Chief Marshal Mark Binskin addresses the crew of HMAS Anzac alongside PM Tony Abbott in the Dardanelles




The amphibious assault started at dawn on April 25, 1915 as wave after wave of British and Irish, French, Australian, New Zealand and Indian troops attacked heavily defended beaches, through barbed wire, and raced up cliffs through scrub.
  • Many were cut down before they reached the shore and the sea turned red from the blood.
    Although Gallipoli is synonymous with Australian and New Zealand heroism, three times as many British and Irish troops were killed as Anzacs (Australian and New Zealand Army Corps).
    Some descendants feel the British involvement has been overlooked by history, perhaps because it ended in failure.
    Prince Harry and Charles met 15 descendants of veterans who were selected to join the commemorations on the beautiful peninsula and ceremonies at Commonwealth War Graves Commission sites.
    Ben Goddard, 37, was there to honour his great-grandfather Private Alfred William Goddard, of 2nd Hampshire Regiment, who landed on V Beach on April 25 1915.

He was hit on the elbow by shrapnel 11 days later but survived the hostilities and was discharged in 1918.

Mr Goddard, from Ropley, Hampshire, knew nothing about the Gallipoli Campaign until he researched his family tree and found out about his ancestor's war record.

He said: 'So many men fought and did not come back. That should be remembered, whether the campaign was a disaster or not.
'I am really proud and honoured to have been chosen, representing the Hampshire Regiment, and be there for the people who did not come back.'


  • Turkish soldiers wait before the commemoration of the Battle of Gallipoli in front of the Turkish Mehmetcik Monument in Gallipoli

  • Turkish soldiers ride their horses during the commemoration of the Battle of Gallipoli in front of the Turkish Mehmetcik Monument in Gallipoli


  • Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan waves to supporters as he travels on a bus through the coastal town of Eceabat in Gallipoli peninsula



In a message ahead of the ceremonies, Mr Erdogan said: 'We paid a high price for the Gallipoli victory. Yet we should not forget that we owe our current independent state to that spirit and perseverance that we showed.'

Ceremonies are also being held across Australia and New Zealand.

Bruce Scates, chair of history and Australian studies at Melbourne's Monash University, is the grandson of a Gallipoli veteran who has been advising the Australian government on how to mark the centenary.








Turkish soldiers rehearse laying a wreath at the Helles Memorial before ceremony to commemorate soldiers killed in the Gallipoli campaign





Heroes: A picture of Captain Herbert Hunter from the 7th Australian infantry is seen on a wall at the Helles Memorial prior a memorial service





'In memory of the glorious dead': A wreath from Queen Elizabeth II is laid at the Cape Helles English Memorial in Gallipoli





Turkish soldiers in traditional uniforms ride by the Cape Helles British Memorial before a service to mark the centenary of the Battle of Gallipoli




An Anzac soldier stands beside rows of rifles at the Cape Helles English Memorial before the commemoration of the Battle of Gallipoli





Anzac soldiers walk past the Cape Helles English Memorial before the commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Gallipoli





Spit and polish: British soldiers put on the finishing touches to their uniforms at at the Helles Memorial prior to the memorial service




He said: 'The 100th anniversary is a very important moment because we're at a time now where this campaign ceases to be about memory and slides into history.
'All of the veterans have died, those with any living memory of the Great War have gone.'

The amphibious assault started at dawn on April 25, 1915 as wave after wave of British and Irish, French, Australian, New Zealand and Indian troops attacked heavily defended beaches, through barbed wire, and raced up cliffs through scrub.
Many were cut down before they reached the shore and the sea turned red from the blood.


  • A sea of poppies blankets Federation Square as part of the '5,000 Poppies' project to commemorate the centenary of Anzac Day in Melbourne






Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott reads a paper poppy containing heart-felt messages at Shrapnel Valley Cemetery near Gallipoli, Turkey





Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott shovels dirt during a tree-planting ceremony at Shrapnel Valley Cemetery on the Gallipoli Peninsula





Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott chats with Ron Eyres whose father Private Samuel Eyres was injured at Shrapnel Valley during the war





Honouring the fallen: Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott plants a cross during a visit to the Lone Pine cemetery and memorial site on the Gallipoli peninsula ahead of the Anzac Day commemorations in Turkey to mark the centenary of the Gallipoli invasion in World War One





Poignant visit: Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott (centre) with RAAF Air Chief Marshall Mark Binskin and Gallipoli guide Mark Kelly at Shell Green Cemetery ahead of Anzac Day commemoration services in Turkey





Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott places a poppy into a memorial wall during a visit at the Lone Pine cemetery on the Gallipoli peninsula











Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan will host leaders of the World War I Allies, including Mr Abbott and New Zealand permier John Key





Light refreshment: Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott at a BBQ breakfast involving bacon and egg rolls on the fight deck of HMAS Anzac in the Dardanelles. The warship will be part of an 11-vessel sail past Anzac Cove during Saturday's 100th anniversary dawn service


  • Strong alliance: More than 10,000 New Zealand and Australian servicemen died in the failed eight-month campaign, with Gallipoli becoming a defining symbol of courage and comradeship for the two nations


  • A woman visits the sea of poppies in Melbourne. Ceremonies are held annually across the country on the April 25 anniversary of the ill-fated 1915 landing of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps at Gallipoli in modern-day Turkey during World War I


  • Pictures of World War One soldiers adorn a sea of poppies that blankets Federation Square as part of the 5000 Poppies project in Melbourne


  • Hugh Gillespie, 72, from near Northallerton, North Yorkshire UK, made the journey for his grandfather Lt Col Franklin Gillespie, who was killed by a sniper while leading a daring raid. He was 42.
    He said: 'Our soldiers behaved so exceptionally and fought extremely well in difficult conditions. I think it is an object lesson in making sure the strategy is right in the first place.
    'Perhaps we could have (succeeded) with better intelligence and I think we underestimated the enemy. I think it turns out it was an impossible task we set ourselves there.'

  • The leaders will attend ceremonies throughout Friday at the beaches where the Allied troops launched their attacks, only to meet with fierce Ottoman resistance that lasted until the evacuation of the last Allied troops in January 1916 in the failed campaign.

  • Respect: Soldiers line up during the Anzac Day eve street parade in Wellington, New Zealand to mark the centenary of the Gallipoli landings






Prince Charles and his son Harry today joined world leaders to mark the centenary of the catastrophic Gallipoli landings which claimed 140,000 lives during World War One.
The royals met descendants of fallen soldiers on the Royal Navy's flagship HMS Bulwark in Turkey's Dardanelles straits, the same crucial waters the Allies hoped to control 100 years ago.

Instead tens of thousands lost their lives on both sides in a nine-month battle between the German-backed Ottoman forces and Allies including Australian, British and New Zealand troops trying to knock the Ottoman Empire out of the war.

Today, soldiers from both the Ottoman and Allied sides lie close together in separate cemeteries on the Gallipoli peninsula on the western edge of Turkey in what has long been seen as a powerful symbol of reconciliation between former enemies.
Hugh Gillespie, 72, from near Northallerton, North Yorkshire, made the journey for his grandfather Lt Col Franklin Gillespie, who was killed by a sniper while leading a daring raid. He was 42.
He said: 'Our soldiers behaved so exceptionally and fought extremely well in difficult conditions. I think it is an object lesson in making sure the strategy is right in the first place.
'Perhaps we could have (succeeded) with better intelligence and I think we underestimated the enemy. I think it turns out it was an impossible task we set ourselves there.'


The leaders will attend ceremonies throughout Friday at the beaches where the Allied troops launched their attacks, only to meet with fierce Ottoman resistance that lasted until the evacuation of the last Allied troops in January 1916 in the failed campaign.





Soldiers from the Wellington Company 5/7 Battalion march through a sea of poppies during a street parade for ANZAC Day in New Zealand





Mounted soldiers tow a gun carriage along Lambton Quay during a street parade to commemorate ANZAC Day in Wellington, New Zealand





A vintage vehicle travels down Lambton Quay during the Anzac Day eve street parade in Wellington to honour the Gallipoli landings





The Last Post is played to commemorate ANZAC Day before a national rugby league match between the Canterbury-Bankstown Bulldogs and the West Tigers at ANZ Stadium in Sydney





A young spectator looks on during the Anzac Day eve street parade in Wellington, New Zealand





Respect: Soldiers line up during the Anzac Day eve street parade in Wellington, New Zealand to mark the centenary of the Gallipoli landings





Soldiers in WW1 replica uniforms look on from the front seat of a truck during the Anzac Day eve street parade in Wellington, New Zealand





Horse dung is shovelled off the surface of Lambton Quay during the Anzac Day eve street parade in Wellington, New Zealand








After attending commemorations for British and other Commonwealth countries, the princes will join a French ceremony this evening.
Tomorrow they will mark Anzac Day by attending a traditional dawn service.

Thousands of Australians and New Zealanders of all ages have travelled to Turkey after winning places in a ballot.
Many will camp overnight to join in the poignant remembrance ceremony.
Marjorie Stevens, 87, from Adelaide in Australia, who had been planning the long trip for 12 months, said: 'It means so much to come back and give them the respect they (the troops) deserve.
'It's hard to keep back the tears and it's so important to keep the link to the past.'

On Saturday, the focus will be on the dawn services to remember the Australian and New Zealand soldiers who lost their lives thousands of miles from home in a sacrifice that helped forge a national consciousness in those nations and is still remembered as Anzac Day on April 25.

'Our forebears faced terrible trials, but the worst of times brought out the very best in them.
'Their perseverance, selflessness, courage and compassion came to define us as a nation,' Abbott said ahead of the anniversary.

However, there are several notable key figures missing, including French President Francois Hollande and Russian President Vladimir Putin, who will be attending commemorations in Yerevan to mark 100 years since the start of mass killings of Armenians under the Ottoman Empire.

The juxtaposition of the dates has aroused heavy emotions ahead of the anniversaries, with Armenians accusing Turkey of shifting the main Gallipoli event forwards by one day from Saturday to Friday to deliberately overshadow the Yerevan ceremonies.

The Gallipoli land campaign began on April 25 when the Allied troops launched their attacks.
Armenians mark the start of the massacres on April 24 when Armenian leaders and intellectuals were rounded up in Constantinople.
Armenia says some 1.5 million Armenians were killed in a campaign of genocide by the Ottoman authorities to wipe out their people.

But Turkey has always resisted the term genocide, sticking to its line with even greater vehemence ahead of the anniversary.

'Armenia is not on our agenda,' at the Gallipoli commemorations, Erdogan said bluntly, sniping that in Yerevan 'they will talk and talk and insult Turkey.'

Turkey is keenly focused on ensuring no dark historical chapters overshadow the commemorations of the Gallipoli Battle, which as in Australia and New Zealand is seen as critical in forming a modern national consciousness.

At dawn on April 25, 1915, waves of Allied troops launched an amphibious attack on the strategically-important peninsula, which was key to controlling the Dardanelles straits, the crucial route to the Black Sea and Russia.
But the plan by Churchill, then First Lord of the Admiralty, was flawed and the campaign in the face of heroic defending by the Turks, led to a stalemate and eight months later, a withdrawal.

Around 58,000 Allied troops died, including 29,500 from Britain and Ireland, over 12,000 from France, 11,000 from Australia and New Zealand and 1,500 from India.
Conditions were hellish as more than half a million Allies faced heat, flies, dysentery and eventually, extreme cold.
An estimated 87,000 Turks were also killed, with 300,000 casualties.

While Anzac Day is nationally-observed in Australia and New Zealand, many relatives felt Britain and Ireland's contribution to the campaign, and the bravery of those who fought, has been overshadowed by the war on the Western Front.
Prince Charles Joins His Son Harry and World Leaders to Mark the 100th Anniversary of the Disastrous Gallipoli Landings Which Claimed 140,000 Lives During World War One






Prince Harry and Charles attend a reception on Royal Navy warship HMS Bulwark where they met descendants of fallen soldiers from the Gallipoli campaign during commemorations for the centenary of the World War One invasion in which 60,000 Allied troops lost their lives





Prince Harry is met by Commander Charles Maynard at a reception on HMS Bulwark in Seddulbahir, Turkey, for the Gallipoli commemorations





Prince Harry meets crew members as he attends a reception on HMS Bulwark with relatives of veterans of the World War One Gallipoli landings





All smiles: Prince Harry and Charles met crew members and 15 descendants of veterans who were selected to join the commemorations





The royals were in Turkey's Dardanelles straits, the same crucial waters that the Allies hoped to control during the First World War








The Prince of Wales and Prince Harry attend a reception on HMS Bulwark with relatives of veterans of the Gallipoli Campaign who 100 years ago were on the eve of what turned out to be one of Britain's worst military disasters



In recognition of this, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan will host leaders including Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott and New Zealand Premier John Key as well as Charles and Harry.


In a message ahead of the ceremonies, Mr Erdogan said: 'We paid a high price for the Gallipoli victory. Yet we should not forget that we owe our current independent state to that spirit and perseverance that we showed.'

Ceremonies are also being held across Australia and New Zealand.

CONTINUED.....
__________________
Nil Carborundum Illegitemi My Advice is Free My Friendship is Priceless

FREEBIES Continue to be a BURDEN on Our Increasing Server/Privacy Costs. Please DONATE Something to HELP...PM an Admin for Further Info.



& Thanks to Those That Have Taken The Time to Register & Become a Member of ... 1...
Ladybbird is online now  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
Old 24-04-15, 17:45   #2
 
Ladybbird's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 35,155
Thanks: 23,729
Thanked 12,742 Times in 8,576 Posts
Ladybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond repute

Awards Showcase
Best Admin Best Admin Gold Medal Gold Medal 
Total Awards: 6

Default Re: FULL MOVIE/PhOtOs-World Remembers Gallipoli-100 Yrs on

Never-Before-Seen Photographs Show Horror of Doomed Gallipoli Landings Through the Eyes of the Soldiers who Fought There

  • An estimated 1,000 Allied soldiers died on the first day of the Winston Churchill's infamous operation
  • Historian Stephen Chambers has released rare photographs to mark the centetary of First World War campaign

These never-before-seen photographs show the horror of the doomed Gallipoli landings through the eyes of the soldiers who survived Winston Churchill's infamous operation.
Today, world leaders were joined by Princes Charles and Harry on the Royal Navy's flagship HMS Bulwark in Turkey's Dardanelles straits to mark the centenary of the catastrophic landings which claimed 140,000 lives during World War One.
An estimated 1,000 Allied soldiers died on the first day of the disastrous invasion until January 1916, when after huge losses on both sides, the Allies successfully fooled the Turkish forces and evacuated their soldiers from the peninsula.
Historian Stephen Chambers has collected more than 100 rare photographs, many taken by the troops themselves, including poignant images of soldiers from their preparation for the first landings right up until the evacuation.
Soldiers are seen being hosed down on the deck of the SS River Clyde, a mule is hoisted on board the ship and even the moment a soldier makes the dash across No Man's Land has been captured for posterity.




These photographs, many taken by soldiers, show the true horror of the doomed Gallipoli landings during World War One, which claimed the lives of 140,000 troops in eight months of fighting before they eventually withdrew to North Africa in January 1916 with no material gain





The invasion is widely considered a shambles as soldiers were sent aimlessly to their deaths in Gallipoli peninsula in a bid to capture the city of Constantinople. Historian Stephen Chambers released the poignant images to mark the catastrophic campaign's centenary





The Gallipoli peninsula is in modern-day Turkey, but in 1915 it was part of the Ottoman Empire. As Allied soldiers prepared to invade, they hoisted a mule hoisted aboard the collier ship SS River Clyde ahead of the three-day journey across the Aegean Sea





The rapid spread of diseases, a lack of clean water and food meant soldiers often suffered from low morale. This image shows the measures taken to prevent the spread of diseases like dysentry, including soldiers being hosed down on the deck





The Ottomans were fighting alongside Germany, so the aim of the campaign was to knock them out of the war by capturing Constantinople, but the plan failed spectacularly, with 250,000 Allied troops injured or killed in vain. Pictured, a signpost warning soldiers of a 'dangerous' sniper





The assault began at dawn on April 25, 1915 as wave after wave of British and Irish, French, Australian, New Zealand and Indian troops attacked heavily defended beaches, through barbed wire and raced up cliffs to attack enemies





Mr Chambers, who is an expert in Gallipoli, which is also known as the Dardanelles Campaign, said: 'Some of the shots are blurry because they are real action shots'. Pictured, a soldier's photograph on the battlefield shows the moment one regiment made the dash across No Manís Land





In January 1916, after huge losses on both sides, the Allies successfully evacuated their soldiers without further casualties. Today, soldiers from both the Ottoman and Allied sides lie close together in separate cemeteries on the Gallipoli peninsula. Pictured, an armoured Rolls Royce




The campaign has become synonymous with the heroism of soldiers from New Zealand and Australia, where Anzac Day is celebrated every year, but more British and Irish soldiers were killed. Pictured, soldiers pictured as they prepare for the campaign





The Gallipoli landings came during a period of deadlock on the Western Front in 1915 when the British hoped to capture Constantinople in a bid to link up with Russia. Pictured, a collection of dummies on board a ship which were to be used in a 'feint landing' during the campaign





The doomed campaign was the brainchild of Winston Churchill thought up to bring an end the war early by creating a new front in the East that the Ottomans would not be able to cope with




After a failed naval attack in February 1915, the Allies tried to capture Constantinople via the Gallipoli Peninsula by land assault. Pictured: The old collier ship SS River Clyde ahead of the journey across the Aegon Sea





On April 25, the world will commemorate 100 years since the Allied fleet sailed into the peninsula and landed on the Turkish beaches (pictured)




Quote:
GALLIPOLI LANDINGS: HOW THE WATERS RAN RED WITH BLOOD AFTER CATASTROPHIC INVASION

The background to the Gallipoli landings was one of deadlock on the Western Front in 1915 when the British hoped to capture Constantinople.
The Russians were under threat from the Turks in the Caucasus and needed help, so the British decided to bombard and try to capture Gallipoli.
Located on the western coast of the Dardanelles, the British hoped by eventually getting to Constantinople that they would link up with the Russians.





Disastrous campaign: Some 86,000 Turkish, 29,500 British and Irish, 12,000 French and 11,000 Australian and New Zealand ('Anzac') troops died during eight months of fighting in modern-day Turkey




SS River Clyde: The former collier ship (pictured in 1919) was supposed to sail straight onto the shore and spill thousands of men onto the Ottoman Empire's shores, but it beached 80yds out on arrival in April 1915


The intention of this was to then knock Turkey out of the war. A naval attack began on February 19 but it was called off after three battleships were sunk.
Then by the time of another landing on April 25, the Turks had been given time to prepare better fortifications and increased their armies sixfold.
Australian and New Zealand troops won a bridgehead at what become known as Anzac Cove as the British aimed to land at five points in Cape Helles - but only managed three.

The British still required reinforcements in these areas and the Turkish were able to bring extra troops onto the peninsula to better defend themselves.





On the boat: The castle and shoreline at Sedul Bahr as seen on New Year's Day 1916 during the Allied occupation of Gallipoli from the bridge of the troopship River Clyde. The campaign ended soon after






Huge losses: Australian stretcher-bearers attending to casualties arriving from the Gallipoli campaign in Cairo, Egypt, with 1,000 Anzac troops during eight months of fighting on the peninsula


A standstill continued through the summer in hot and filthy conditions, and the campaign was eventually ended by the War Council in winter 1915/16.

The invasion had been intended to knock Turkey out of the war, but in the end it only gave the Russians some breathing space from the Turks.

Anzac Cove became a focus for Australian pride after forces were stuck there in squalid conditions for eight months, defending the area from the Turks.

The Anzac soldiers who arrived on the narrow strip of beach were faced with a difficult environment of steep cliffs and ridges - and almost daily shelling.

At the height of the fighting during the landings of April 25, 1915, the waters around the peninsula were stained red with blood at one point 150ft out.

Fierce resistance from the under-rated Ottoman forces, inhospitable terrain and bungled planning spelled disaster for the campaign.




Widows of Fallen Heroes Make a Trip to Gallipoli (related)



Prince Charles & Prince Harry Meet Relatives of Gallipoli Veterans



The Gallipoli Catastrophe (FULL Documentary)



FULL Movie


__________________
Nil Carborundum Illegitemi My Advice is Free My Friendship is Priceless

FREEBIES Continue to be a BURDEN on Our Increasing Server/Privacy Costs. Please DONATE Something to HELP...PM an Admin for Further Info.



& Thanks to Those That Have Taken The Time to Register & Become a Member of ... 1...
Ladybbird is online now  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
Post New ThreadReply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.5.2
Designed by: vBSkinworks