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Old 11-02-17, 00:34   #1
 
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Hot Natives Pipeline Fight > LAND Needs WATER-NOT OIL

Revealed: FBI Terrorism Taskforce Investigating Native American Standing Rock Activists

FBI Representatives have Contacted Several ‘Water Protectors’ > Wanting to Raise Alarm that an Indigenous-Led Movement is Being Construed as.. "DOMESTIC TERRORISM" ???... ....

Daily Mail UK, 10 February 2017/The Guardian UK, 10 February 2017.

> ALL about $$$ folks = to heck with the people..





100 people gathered near the White House, denouncing Trump, who issued an order four on 24 January to expedite both the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) and to revive another multibillion-dollar oil artery, Keystone XL


The FBI is investigating political activists campaigning against the Dakota Access pipeline, diverting agents charged with preventing terrorist attacks to instead focus their attention on indigenous activists and environmentalists.

The Guardian has established that multiple officers within the FBI’s joint terrorism taskforce have attempted to contact at least three people tied to the Standing Rock “water protector” movement in North Dakota.

The purpose of the officers’ inquiries into Standing Rock, and scope of the task force’s work, remains unknown. Agency officials declined to comment.

But the fact that the officers have even tried to communicate with activists is alarming to free-speech experts who argue that anti-terrorism agents have no business scrutinizing protesters.


“The idea that the government would attempt to construe this indigenous-led non-violent movement into some kind of domestic terrorism investigation is unfathomable to me,” said Lauren Regan, a civil rights attorney who has provided legal support to demonstrators who were contacted by representatives of the FBI. “It’s outrageous, it’s unwarranted … and it’s unconstitutional.”


Regan, who has regularly visited Standing Rock and is the executive director of the Civil Liberties Defense Center in Oregon, said she learned of three cases in which officers with the taskforce, known as the JTTF, tried to talk to activists in person.


She described the encounters as attempted “knocks and talks”, meaning law enforcement showed up at people’s doors without a subpoena or warrant and tried to get them to voluntarily cooperate with an interview.


The three individuals, who include a Native American and a non-indigenous activist, asserted their fifth amendment rights and did not respond to the officers, according to Regan, who declined to identify them to protect their privacy and out of fear of retribution.


Construction equipment near the Dakota Access pipeline. Workers have begun drilling after the army corps granted the permit necessary.


Two of them were contacted in North Dakota and a third at their home outside the state, according to Regan.
She said all three contacts were made in recent weeks after Trump’s inauguration.


Trump, a former investor in Energy Transfer Partners, the Texas-based firm behind the pipeline, took executive action in his first week in office to expedite the project.



On Wednesday, workers began drilling to complete the pipeline across the Missouri river.


The JTTF revelation comes at a time when there have been increasing concerns at Standing Rock about law enforcement surveillance, police violence and the targeted arrests and prosecutions of activists.

Since the summer, law enforcement officials have made roughly 700 arrests, in some cases leading to serious felony charges and possibly lengthy state prison sentences. Following recent indictments, at least six activists are now facing charges in federal court. Rumors about JTTF have caused further stress among the activists.


Regan said she was able to confirm the identity of one of the JTTF officers, Andrew Creed, who attempted to contact an activist. Reached by phone, he declined to comment to the Guardian, saying, “I can’t talk to you” before hanging up.

An FBI spokesman, Jeffrey Van Nest, also declined to answer any questions, saying: “We’re not in a position to provide a comment as to the existence of an investigation.”


In November, a JTTF officer also showed up to the hospital room of Sophia Wilansky, a 21-year-old who was seriously injured during a standoff with law enforcement at Standing Rock, according to her father, Wayne Wilansky. The FBI took her clothes and still have not returned them, he said in an interview this week.

Wayne said he suspected that the FBI brought a terrorism agent given that local police had alleged that activists set off an explosion that caused his daughter’s injuries. Witnesses have said they believe she was hit by a police concussion grenade.


The timing of the FBI hospital visit in Minneapolis was upsetting, he added. “It was especially disturbing, because Sophia’s blood pressure was going up. She was about to be wheeled into surgery.


Activists at Standing Rock have faced blizzard conditions at the camp during the winter months.

Police have repeatedly painted the anti-pipeline movement as dangerous, which is why JTTF may be involved, Regan said.

“From the very beginning, local law enforcement has attempted to justify its militarized presence … by making false allegations that somehow these water protectors were violent.”

The attorney said it also seemed likely that JTTF may have contacted other US WATER PROTECORS, and said she worried they may not have realized their best option is to remain silent and contact a lawyer.


This is not the first time the JTTF has been tied to an investigation of civil rights protesters. Records from Minnesota suggested that the taskforce monitored a Black Lives Matter demonstration against contaminated water supply in lakes .


For indigenous leaders who have vowed to continue fighting the pipeline on the ground, the FBI investigations and ongoing federal prosecutions have become increasingly worrisome.

It’s particularly troubling to some given the US government’s history of aggressively targeting Native American protesters and turning them into political prisoners.


“This is history repeating itself,” said LaDonna Brave Bull Allard, who founded the first camp opposing the pipeline. “I keep on thinking, how we did come to this point? … When did America stop following the law?”

Brandy-Lee Maxie, a 34-year-old Nakota tribe member from Canada, said it’s difficult not to worry about possible prosecution. But the cause, she said, is too important to give up:

“I’m staying here. Whatever happens to those who stay happens. We’ve just got to keep praying.”
END.


NB: From Ladybbird;

Please do not forget, that the countries we now know as AMERICA & CANADA, (North America), were once part of THE NEW WORLD.

Indians were living in both regions for centuries, before the white immigrants moved in. They were the FIRST ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS! NOT the Mexicans, etc.
They stole land from Mexico and tortured and killed Mexicans and Taino Indians that lived in Mexico..

When Chinese immigrants later arrived in 'America', they were enslaved, as were the Irish and black people > MANY DIED...

"In HISTORY, every great EMPIRE has 'fallen', America will be next.".



Not a surpise TRUMP has changed his mind about CHINA.. > who own most of US ports,, etc.

+ The US can only continue to survive, if CHINA does not recall the loans they have made to the US, over many years..

Remember part of ex-President Obama's final speech.."Let's see how Mr Trump feels, when he becomes President and knows more"..

AND... Note how Mr Trump has slowed down in his rhetoric & reversed nearly ALL of his crazy ideas, since he became President.. ... ...

Simple as that folks...

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Old 13-02-17, 19:29   #2
 
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Update re: TRUMP's Crazy Decisions= He Could Be Removed From Office >Clause in Constitution

US Army Veterans Return to Standing Rock to Form a Human Shield Against Police

A growing group of military veterans are willing to put their bodies between Native American activists and the police trying to remove them.

'We’ve stood in the face of fire before. We feel a responsibility to use the skills we have'


The Independent UK, 13 February 2017





Clashes with police turned violent in December, when around 1,000 veterans formed a human shield between police and 'water protector' protesters Getty Images



US army veterans are returning to Standing Rock to protect Dakota Access pipeline protesters amid violent clashes with the police.

Native American activists are camped near the construction site and some hope the veterans could make it harder for police to remove them.

“We are prepared to put our bodies between Native elders and a privatised military force,” air force veteran Elizabeth Williams told The Guardian.

“We’ve stood in the face of fire before. We feel a responsibility to use the skills we have.”

Police used water hoses and tear gas, and one canister badly damaged the arm of a female protester.

Hundreds of people were arrested.


Native American protesters vowed they would not back down after Trump signed his executive order, overturning decisions made by Barack Obama to halt the construction of the pipeline.


It is opposed by a Native American tribe fearful of water contamination from potential oil leaks.

So far, military veteran organisation Veterans Stand has raised more then $200,000 for a renewed campaign effort against the controversial oil pipeline.

The group will use the money to send supplies to the reservation to help protesters and those who will be affected by the construction of the $3.7bn pipeline.

The growing group of military veterans could make it harder for police and government officials to try to remove hundreds of activists who remain camped near the construction site and, some hope, could limit use of excessive force by law enforcement during demonstrations.

“We are prepared to put our bodies between Native elders and a privatized military force,” said Elizabeth Williams, a 34-year-old air force veteran, who arrived at Standing Rock with a group of vets late on Friday. “We’ve stood in the face of fire before. We feel a responsibility to use the skills we have.”

It is unclear how many vets may arrive to Standing Rock; some organizers estimate a few dozen are on their way, while other activists are pledging that hundreds more could show up in the coming weeks.

Demonstrators also plan to assemble near Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate to protest his decision.

.

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Old 14-02-17, 00:17   #3
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Default re: TRUMP's Crazy Decisions= He Could Be Removed From Office >Clause in Constitution

I am glad to see our vets stand with them. It's a crying shame after all our native Indians have been put through the past few hundred years, being run off their land, massacred and made to spend their lives on federally granted reservations just to be walked on all over again and again. Some times I wonder how this nation of the U.S. got to be so blessed with all the evil in our government. One thing I do know is our government is sooooo good at putting blinders on the citizens of America. People just don't think for themselves anymore but just listen to all the fake news on the idiot boxes (TV), being just like sheep lid to the slaughter.
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Old 12-03-17, 14:48   #4
 
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Default re: TRUMP's Crazy Decisions= He Could Be Removed From Office >Clause in Constitution

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarfoot View Post
I am glad to see our vets stand with them. It's a crying shame after all our native Indians have been put through the past few hundred years, being run off their land, massacred and made to spend their lives on federally granted reservations just to be walked on all over again and again. Some times I wonder how this nation of the U.S. got to be so blessed with all the evil in our government. One thing I do know is our government is sooooo good at putting blinders on the citizens of America. People just don't think for themselves anymore but just listen to all the fake news on the idiot boxes (TV), being just like sheep lid to the slaughter.

It is disgraceful and after many of the VETs were brutally removed/arrested, some have left the protest..
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Old 12-03-17, 15:17   #5
 
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Update re: TRUMP's Crazy Decisions= He Could Be Removed From Office >Clause in Constitution

EXCLUSIVE: 'We Will Not Stop Fighting to Protect OUR Lands.'
Chairman of Standing Rock Tribe says President Trump Never Consulted him Before Signing Executive Order Reviving the Dakota Access Pipeline


  • Chairman of the tribe, Dave Archambault II, said it was 'unfortunate' that the President intended to take action today to advance construction
  • 'It's about looking at what's been here in this nation and who has been paying the cost for the economics,' he added
  • Barack Obama had halted the progress of the Dakota pipeline in early December
  • President Trump reversed Obama's decision, signing an executive action on Tuesday to forge ahead with construction of the Dakota Access pipeline
  • Archambault said he should have been consulted by the new administration
  • Activists had spent months on the land protesting the $3.8 billion pipeline which they believe will endanger the tribe's water supply and lands
  • Between 700 and 800 people remain at the protest camp in North Dakota despite the treacherous winter weather warnings
Daily Mail UK, 12 March 2017


The chairman of Standing Rock Sioux tribe told DailyMail.com that they have been given no opportunity to speak with the Trump administration about their concerns over the Dakota Access Pipeline and said it was 'unfortunate' that the President took action today to advance construction.
Dave Archambault II told DailyMail.com in an exclusive interview: 'It's unfortunate that he's taken a look at only one side.
'It's not just about energy economics or providing jobs for the masses but it's about looking at what's been here in this nation and who has been paying the cost for the economics.





Chairman of Standing Rock Sioux tribe Dave Archambault II said that they have been given no opportunity to speak with the Trump administration about their concerns over the Dakota Access Pipeline





President Trump signed an executive action on Tuesday to forge ahead with construction of the pipeline..



'We are not opposed to economic development but we are opposed to paying the cost so that this nation can benefit.
'I was hoping I would be able to help him understand but I was never given the opportunity to share our concerns and to help him understand why there has been resistance to this pipeline.'

Trump signed an executive action to forge ahead with construction of the Dakota Access pipeline.

Activists had spent months at the Oceti Sakowin camp on the land of the Standing Rock tribe in North Dakota protesting the $3.8 billion pipeline which they believe will endanger the tribe's water supply and lands.

Barack Obama had halted the progress of the Dakota pipeline in early December. Obama also rejected Transcanada Corp's Keystone XL oil pipeline in 2015 after environmentalists campaigned against the project for more than seven years.





Activists had spent months on the land protesting the $3.8 billion pipeline which they believe will endanger the tribe's water supply and lands





Hundreds of tribe members, activists and military veterans marched in a show of solidarity against the Dakota Access in December, after Trump announced his support for the project





Protesters braved the heavy blizzards at the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in North Dakota...





Between 700 and 800 people remain at the protest camp in North Dakota despite the treacherous winter weather warnings...



Chairman Archambault said his tribe would not give up the fight against the pipeline and to protect their lands.
Between 700-800 people remain at the protest camp in North Dakota despite the treacherous winter weather warnings.

He said: 'That's what I don't think the Trump administration understands about the concerns that we have.
'We will continue to build awareness and to try to help this nation understand what is important to us.
'My mission has always been to provide the best future for children who have not yet been born and to do the best we can.'



Quote:

A TIMELINE OF EVENTS SURROUNDING THE DAKOTA ACCESS PIPELINE


December 2014: Energy Transfer Partners LP apply to build a $3.8billion pipeline crossing North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa and Illinois that would carry 570,000 barrels of crude oil a day

March 11, 2016: Iowa is the last of the four states to approve the pipeline after the state's utilities board unanimously voted for it. The Environmental Protection Agency also sends a letter to the US Army Corp of Engineer to perform an environmental assessment

April 1, 2016: About 200 tribal members from a number of Native American nations stage a protest on horseback. They oppose the pipeline passing through burial sites and land sacred to the Standing Rock Sioux and worry the project will contaminate their drinking water

April 29, 2016: Standing Rock Sioux send a petition to the Army Corps of Engineers, the federal agency overseeing the project, and demand a more thorough environmental impact study

July 26, 2016: The Corp of Engineers approves the most of the final permits, including land easements and 200 water crossings. A spokeswoman for the project says construction can move forward 'in all areas as quickly as possible'

July 27, 2016: The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe files a lawsuit against the Corp of Engineers

August 1, 2016: About $1million worth of equipment is intentionally torched along the DAPL route in Iowa, police say

August 24, 2016: The Standing Rock Sioux brought their case before a federal district judge, saying the government did not consult them on the route of the pipeline. Federal attorneys said the tribe declined the chance to assess the pipeline with them, while Archambault later said they had met with Energy Transfer and explicitly stated their opposition

September 3, 2016: At least six protesters are attacked by guard dogs belonging to a private security company, while dozens more are hit with pepper spray, according to tribe spokesperson Steve Sitting Bear

September 6, 2016: Brian Cladoosby, president of the National Congress of American Indians, makes an appeal to President Barack Obama's advisers to support the Standing Rock Sioux


September 9, 2016: A federal judge rules against the Standing Rock Sioux's request to half construction of the DAPL, but the US Justice and Interior Departments and Army issue an order later that day to halt construction


October 9, 2016: The Standing Rock Sioux's appeal is shot down in federal court, which rules the DAPL can continue construction

October 10, 2016: Actress Shailene Woodleyis arrested for trespassing and engaging in a riot while protesting the pipeline

October 27, 2016:
Officers in riot gear fire bean bags and pepper spray in clashes that result in around 140 arrests. A protest coordinator claimed he was held in a mesh enclosure that appeared to be a dog kennel, which the Morton County Sheriff's Department called 'temporary holding cells (chain link fences)'

October 31, 2016: Supporters mobilize on Facebook, checking into Standing Rock through the social media platform to confuse law enforcement, who were said to be gathering information on protesters, although the sheriff's department said that was 'absolutely false'

November 8, 2016: Energy Transfer Partners LP says the pipeline has reached Lake Oahe


November 17, 2016: The Corps of Engineers says it plans to 'revise its regulations' to ensure its consultations with sovereign tribes are 'confirmed by the U.S. Constitution, treaties, statutes, executive orders, judicial decisions and presidential documents and policies'


November 20, 2016: Authorities use water cannons and rubber bullets on protesters. Sophia Wilansky, a 21-year-old New Yorker, is airlifted to a hospital in Minneapolis after her left hand and arm was injured in an explosion. Her father claims a member of law enforcement threw an object at her which exploded, but law enforcement suggested fellow protesters were to blame

November 25, 2016: Citing safety concerns, the Corps of Engineers say anyone found north of the Cannonball River, which includes the Oceti Sakowin camp, after December 5, could be prosecuted with trespassing. Protest organizers said it was unlikely they would leave

November 28, 2016: North Dakota's Governor Jack Dalrymple orders an emergency evacuation of Dakota Access pipeline protesters, citing harsh winter conditions


December 4, 2016: About 2,000 veterans arrive, saying they will carry on and give protesters who have engaged in the standoff for months a break


December 4, 2016: Obama halts progress of the pipeline. The US Army Corps of Engineers will not grant an easement allowing the pipeline's construction half a mile south of the Standing Rock Indian Reservation




NB: Trump has a financial interest in the DAKOTA ACCESS PIPELINE going ahead.......



UPDATE;


Keystone XL Oil Pipeline Will NOT use American Steel, Despite Donald Trump’s Pledge...

The Keystone XL oil pipeline will not use American steel, seemingly contrary to a Donald Trump election pledge.

AP. 12 March 2017


The White House has claimed this is due to the language used in a presidential directive, which applies to new pipelines or those under repair.

Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the White House spokeswoman, has said it would be difficult for US steel to be used on the Keystone pipeline as it is already under construction.

As recently as last week, Mr Trump had pledged that the Dakota Access pipeline and Keystone would not be built unless American steel was used.

The company responsible for building Keystone, TransCanada, has said the majority of the steel would come from North America, which includes Canada and Mexico.

Soon after taking office, Mr Trump used his executive powers to restart the two pipeline projects that had been blocked by his predecessor, Barack Obama.

The Keystone pipeline will run from Canada to refineries in the Gulf Coast.

It was commissioned in 2010 and has attracted a range of environmental protests. The pipeline was rejected by Mr Obama.
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Old 15-06-17, 14:24   #6
 
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Hot Dakota Pipeline:Native Americans Fight To STOP Greed Destroying Environment

Quote:

'Those are Our Eiffel Towers, Our Pyramids':

Why Standing Rock is About Much More Than Oil


Standing Rock is cast as an environmental protest, but the Native American Water Protectors are part of a religious tradition that predates Christianity

.
The project led to months of demonstrations near the Standing Rock reservation and hundreds of protesters, including US VETs, were arrested. The protests died off with the clearing of the main encampment in February and the completion of the pipeline.




Police officers use TEAR GAS against Native Americans & US Vets Water Protectors trying to access Turtle Island on 2 November, 2016. They were treated like Terrorists

The Guardian, 15 JUN 2017


The LEGAL Residents of The New Land (Now called America) - Native Americans Religious Traditions


Native American participants of Standing Rock identify as Water Protectors rather than protestors and this identification is part of a religious tradition deeply ingrained in their worldview. The camp near the pipeline is named Sacred Stone Camp after a religious tradition relating to the confluence of the Missouri and Cannonball rivers. The camp’s motto is “Defend the Sacred” and much of their activity is singing and praying.

Native Americans have an ancient and rich worldview. Analysis of ancient DNA from the Pacific Northwest to Mexico connects modern indigenous peoples to the earliest humans in the Americas. There is no written record from these ancient cultures; however, oral traditions have been passed down for generations. A recent archaeological discovery in the Pacific Northwest suggests that an oral tradition has survived over 14,000 years.

Indigenous cultures have a worldview fundamentally different to the West: the animate earth. North America is composed of countless nations that have different languages, economies, and social structures including matrilineal and patrilineal traditions. It is a constellation of cultures that is often grouped into the single category “Native American,” a term that poorly expresses the multitude of peoples present.

However, within the many nations of the midwest and south are shared religious elements; an “analogous history of shared cultural themes, transmitted and adopted from Archaic times through the Woodland period and into the Mississippian centuries, continuing in modified form into the Colonial period and even lasting substantially in a few tribes down to the present time” writes Richard Townsend. He explains that archaeology and oral traditions “form an extraordinary record of cultural continuity.”

Just as Western religions are shared across many nations and cultures, these religious elements are found among the diverse indigenous nations of North America, including the Lakota Sioux at Standing Rock.

The key elements of the religious themes are found in the creation story. According to a version told by the medicine man Swimmer, in the beginning there was no land, only endless primordial waters. A creature (a turtle to the Lakota, but a duck, muskrat, or other creature in different traditions) dove deep into the waters and brought mud to the surface.

The mud was spread over the waters to create the Earth Island, or Turtle Island in the Lakota tradition. The cosmos is therefore composed of three levels: the Upper World (sky), This World (land), and the Lower World (waters).
The Upper World is composed the sky, which is highly ordered as seen by the predicable passing of the sun, moon, and stars.
The Lower World is the opposite; it is a cold, watery place that is chaotic.

Evidence can be seen in springs, whose water is always cold in summer’s heat, yet never freezes in the cold of winter, and activity can always be seen below the surface. Spirits inhabit each of these levels, such as the Thunder Bird in the Upper World and the uktena, a snake with horns, in the Lower World.

However, spirits are neither good or evil. Each pursues its own interests and can either help or harm a person. Humans, on Earth in between the ordered Upper World and the chaotic Lower World, must use these two extremes against each other. While the particulars of the oral traditions differ between nations, these themes of the religion reappear. Religion and medicine are about correcting imbalances, using spirits from either side to maintain balance. For this reason, both Upper and Lower world spirits are sacred, especially locations that are interfaces between levels of the cosmos.

The microcosm-macrocosm principle is an important component of the animate earth. Each place – caves, cliffs, springs, etc. – has a spirit and can influence the cosmos, which is where the term animate earth originates. Landscape, built structures, and artwork recreate the cosmos through the microcosm-macrocosm principle.

The mounds that indigenous peoples built all over the continent are thought to be reconstructions of the Earth Island and many have sand or mud as their first layer to represent the sediment that was spread over the primordial sea.
Since affecting the microcosm has influence over the macrocosm, sites like Turtle Island at Standing Rock, Camp Coldwater Spring, or Waconda Spring are not only microcosms of the Earth, but are regarded as the same as the actual place of creation.

Spiritual leader Gary Cavender described, “The Camp Coldwater spring is a sacred spring... The Spring is the dwelling place of the undergods and is near the center of the Earth... The spring is the site of our creation myth (or ‘Garden of Eden’) and the beginning of Indian existence on Earth.”

There are commonalities found among Native Americans cultures in the past and present relating to these religious traditions. Motifs such as the Thunder Bird and underwater spirits like the uktena are found in every period. Certain materials associated with the three-leveled cosmos such as mica, copper, quartz, and meteorites have been used in religious contexts for centuries. These symbols provide evidence of the continuity of these religious themes across ever-changing cultures, economies, and languages. It is a religious tradition dating to the Archaic Period and may originate earlier in the Paleoindian period.


European Versus Indigenous Perception of Religious Places



Western religions use built structures to distinguish sacred places from the natural world. It is a ‘flag mentality’ where ownership is identified through imposing a material object on a landscape, such as the planting of a flag or building a church.

In contrast, native traditions conduct religious ceremonies at notable landscape features such as high cliffs, buttes, caves, springs, and the confluence of rivers, often without structures or objects. The dissonance between these two worldviews results in misunderstanding by non-native peoples as to what constitutes a sacred place.

An example is Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, which is built on an indigenous sacred landscape. Many of the holy locations are watery places: St. Anthony Falls, Camp Coldwater Spring, and the confluence of the Minnesota and Mississippi rivers.

The holy of holies is Wakan Tibi, or Sacred House, whose European name is Carver’s Cave. The cave contained a lake where the Great Spirit lived.

Every year, leaders from every Sioux nation would set aside differences and meet in front of the cave to discuss alliances and grievances. Despite evidence from oral histories, archaeologists in the 1970s argued that the cave was not culturally important because there were no “things” found in it.
Dialogue has changed this erroneous perception and Wakan Tibi/Carver’s Cave is now understood to have great cultural significance. However, this error persists at Standing Rock.

This is not to say that Native peoples did not build structures, simply that not every religious place contains structures or objects. Cahokia, near present day St. Louis, had a population at its peak that rivaled medieval Paris and London. The city was composed of massive mounds that are still standing today, as well as wooden construction that has since disappeared.

Nevertheless, even the Mississippians of Cahokia revered the sacred places of the earlier Hopewell, as did the later Siouan cultures. Rather than built structures as found at European religious sites, these animate earth religious sites can be identified as natural formations: springs, rocky outcrops, and caves. Especially dramatic or unique formations are revered as the most sacred places such as Wakan Tibi/Carver’s Cave, Waconda Spring, and Bears Ears.


Standing Rock in Religious Context


These religious traditions provide the context for Standing Rock’s opposition to the pipeline. Even if indigenous spokespersons were not telling the public that the area where the pipeline passes is a sacred location, the landscape itself is clearly identifiable as fitting these religious elements.

The pipeline’s route crosses a high rock promontory at the confluence of two rivers, a landscape that is an interface between the levels of the cosmos. The island where the Water Protectors attempt to gather is named Turtle Island and it is a microcosm of the Earth Island upon the waters. An island that rises high above the surrounding landscape, visible from far away, and the confluence of two rivers are immediately identifiable elements of a Native American sacred location.

Just as the confluence of the Minnesota and Mississippi rivers is a holy place in Minnesota, the confluence of the Cannon Ball and Missouri rivers at Turtle Island is sacred, but it has an added significance. “At the confluence of where those two rivers met was a great whirlpool that created perfectly round stones that were considered to be sacred,” Jon Eagle Sr. explained in an interview to Indian Country Magazine.

The Sioux call the river Inyan Wakan Kagapi Wakpa, or River Where the Sacred Stone Are Made- wakan translating as sacred or holy. Religious ceremonies have been performed at this location for centuries. Both the river and the local town of Cannon Ball take their names from the round stones that formed in the river.

The area and stones are sacred, a “historic place of commerce where enemy tribes camped peacefully within sight of each other because of the reverence they had for this place. In the area are sacred stones where our ancestors went to pray for good direction, strength and protection for the coming year. Those stones are still there, and our people still go there today,” explains Eagle. The Water Protectors’ camp is named Sacred Stone Camp for this location.

Meeting places where conflict was forbidden were rare. These sacred sites are only found next to the most important natural formations, often centered around watery places like springs or rivers. Examples include Wakan Tibi/Carver’s Cave, Waconda Spring, and Standing Rock’s whirlpool.

Unfortunately, the entrance to Wakan Tibi was destroyed to create a rail system and the Army Corps destroyed both Waconda Spring and the Cannon Ball River whirlpool through dam construction.


Quote:
This is the first time the 7 bands of the Sioux have come together since Little Bighorn.
Hawste Wakiyan Wicasa

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.
The Army Corps and Energy Transfer Partners have argued that the land that the pipeline crosses is not sacred since there is no evidence of buildings or burials. An archaeological assessment confirmed that no burials were present, but it did not include analysis of the landscape from the perspective cosmology and oral traditions.

Not only did the decision to move forward with the pipeline ignore the fact that most indigenous sacred places do not have built structures, but it also demonstrates a lack of understanding of Sioux burial practices. The Sioux place the dead on scaffolds 6-12 feet high or in trees so they are open to the sky.

The idea that the area around Turtle Island should contain built structures or bodies interred in the ground in order for it to be considered a holy site is a European perspective on religious places. Though Standing Rock citizens explained this to the government and showed evidence from oral histories and ethnographies since the 18th century, the pipeline continues to move forward.

The desire to protect Standing Rock has mobilised indigenous communities as never before. “This is the first time the seven bands of the Sioux have come together since Little Bighorn [in 1876],” Hawste Wakiyan Wicasa told BBC in an interview. “Now, we have no weapons, only prayers.” To categorise Standing Rock as anti-industry or solely an environmental protest is to misunderstand the context.


The first Sioux treaty in 1851 provided 12,500,000 acres to indigenous peoples, but it was reduced to 640,000 acres by 1910 as the US government successively broke four treaties.



From the 1940-1970s, dam construction disproportionately submerged indigenous property, often targeting communities and sacred places. The two largest reservations in North Dakota were chosen as locations for reservoirs with Garrison Dam flooding 153,00 acres of indigenous property and Oahe Dam flooding 200,000 acres of Standing Rock Reservation.
Losing homes, schools, and infrastructure, the dislocated families were left without roads, running water, or basic living conditions and they continue to await proper compensation. The famous scholar Vine Deloria, Jr., who was from Standing Rock, said the dam program was, “the single most destructive act ever perpetuated on any tribe by the United States.”

Sacred places have been purposefully targeted; the Mount Rushmore monument in South Dakota was built over the Black Hills (Ȟe Sápa), the holiest site in Sioux religion, and Waconda Spring, Kansas, was submerged under the Glen Elder Dam.

A unique geological formation, the decision to submerge Waconda Spring (indigenous name: Ne-Wakan Tonka) was widely protested by indigenous peoples, white residents, and the scientific community. For no practical purpose, buildings were bulldozed into the spring before it was submerged.

The nationwide targeting of religious places, along with massacres (the Whitestone Hill Massacre, which killed more civilians than Wounded Knee, occurred to the east of Standing Rock), and the removal and forced re-education of indigenous children has left indigenous communities mistrustful of the government.

When the pipeline was diverted from Bismarck, followed by the waiving of the mandated environmental and historical preservation assessments, indigenous communities felt the Army Corps was repeating the actions of the dam projects.





Native American reservations and reservoir projects in the United States with an inset image of reservoirs in Sioux territories, including Standing Rock. Illustration: Mateusz Polakowski




The public may not be aware of the destruction of indigenous religious sites, but to Native Americans the attacks are equivalent to the loss of sites like the Vatican, Notre Dame, the Ka’ba, or Temple Mount.


“Those are our synagogues. Those are our Eiffel Towers, our pyramids. When you look out at the land, you don’t see anything like [Turtle Island]; how it comes out of the ground. Everything about us is with the Earth, including our [sacred] sites,” explained Floris White Bull, when describing Turtle Island’s significance.



Indigenous religious places have centuries of oral traditions demonstrating their importance and early Europeans recorded their place-names so that derivations of wakan/wicon/wakhon are found on maps across the country. The Standing Rock protest is the most recent product of a lengthy history of government and state policies that disregard native spokespersons and misunderstand what constitutes a sacred place.


The Need for Indigenous Spokespersons in the Media




There is a Sioux oral tradition of a “black snake” that would one day come to their homeland, which many in the community interpret as the pipeline.


The artwork around Sacred Stone Camp depicts Upper World imagery, which reflects action to balance the cosmos against a Lower World spirit like the “black snake.” In every regard the Sioux have been consistent in their religious practice, but government and state officials do not listen to the indigenous spokespersons
: ..






CROPS/FISH & WILDLIFE are aleady dying because of the drilling works for the PIPELINE & WATER POLUTION..






Inhabitents try to save what crops they have, before the WATER Supply to the LAND dries up



While the public was shocked to see force used against protestors at the behest of a corporation, the response was muted to some degree because the media has failed to address the religious aspects of the Water Protectors.

Cast as an environmental protest, the media coverage gives the impression of hippies and anti-establishment types rather than one of the oldest religions under attack. The actions failed to garner the same phrasing or passions as the coverage of the attacks on Christian communities in the Middle East.




There is a broad public failure to understand indigenous issues and religion, which is why indigenous voices are needed on the major media networks. The most significant concern should be that the United States government still does not listen or believe indigenous communities when they speak about their religion. The Standing Rock Sioux have been unequivocal about the sacred nature of Turtle Island and the path of the pipeline, yet the Army Corps, courts, and the State of North Dakota sought evidence and conducted studies to prove whether or not these statements are valid.

These policies are not confined to the Dakota Access Pipeline. At the request of 30 Native American tribes, the Obama Administration protected the sacred Bears Ears by creating a national monument. President Obama described the landscape in terms that readers should now find familiar,


“Rising from the center of the southeastern Utah landscape and visible from every direction are twin buttes so distinctive that in each of the native languages of the region their name is the same: Hoon’Naqvut, Shash Jáa, Kwiyagatu Nukavachi, Ansh An Lashokdiwe, or ‘Bears Ears.’



For hundreds of generations, native peoples lived in the surrounding deep sandstone canyons, desert mesas…one of the densest and most significant cultural landscapes in the United States.”


However, the Trump Administration announced a review of 24 monuments, including Bears Ears, and will potentially reverse the protection. Four of the reviewed monuments are submerged marine monuments, but 19 of the remaining 20 contain Native American sacred places or archaeological sites.

Newly appointed Supreme Court justice Neil Gorsuch built his reputation protecting Christian religious freedom and expression, including monuments. It would be interesting to see how he would rule on an indigenous religious place.



Oral traditions and archaeological evidence demonstrate continuity from the early cultures on the continent through present day, a religious tradition that may predate most of the world’s major religions. If members of the Cult of the River Keepers from 5,000 years ago awoke today, there is little they would recognize. However, they might identify elements of their religion in the Standing Rock Water Protectors. As the pipeline opens on May 15, it is worth having a public discussion about the religious context of Standing Rock in the hope that the surviving sacred sites will not suffer the same fate. That discussion begins by listening to indigenous spokespersons when they speak about their religion and experiences.
END


NB: If the pipeline goes ahead, over 18 million Americans will also lose their WATER SUPPLY > NOT just Native Americans. Where are they in all these protests ?


+ Oil CEO Tried To Bribe Native Americans To Support Dakota Pipeline..READ MORE.. CLICK Here;



Oil CEO Says Bribing Native Americans Will Stop Dakota Protests | News | teleSUR English


.


Quote:
rose halsey3 months ago (on YouTube)

I Pray for All People-----White Ranchers & Farmers & Cities/Towns down stream will be affected greatly should the Pipeline leak! ( God Help Us Human Beings/Birds/Fish/Creatures!!!! So very sad how it all ended! I cried for days after it was forced closed-Forever & Ever!! My Relatives who live in Cannonball will be watched by Law Enforcement forever!! I am so sad for All of Us. We are all doomed!!

.


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Standing Rock FULL Documentary: Who, What and Why of the DAPL Protests (Must Watch)




.

TRUMP is only interested in saving years of his failed business attempts.. > He still has over 400 legal court cases against him, involving SUB-Contractors and previous employees.. Not surprising he does not want anyone to see his TAX RETURNS, NOR AUDITS within..
It is called CORRUPTION.

Now he is President of the US.
END.


Quote:
"In History, EVERY GREAT EMPIRE Has fallen... America Will Be NEXT" ..
Tony Benn, WISE British MP, that Knew CHURCHILL Before they both died


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Update Re: Natives Pipeline Fight > LAND Needs WATER-NOT OIL

Standing Rock Activist Faces Prison After Officer Shot Him in The Face


The Guardian UK, 4 Oct 2018.


Marcus Mitchell lay facedown on the snowy North Dakota prairie, blood pouring through the gaping wound on the left side of his face. It was just past midnight on 19 January 2017, and a Morton county sheriff’s deputy had just shot the 21-year-old activist with a bean bag pellet amid a demonstration near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation against the Dakota Access pipeline. The lead pellet entered Mitchell’s left eye socket, shattering the orbital wall of his eye and his cheekbone, and ripping open a flap of skin nearly to his left ear.

Paramedics brought Mitchell to the Sanford medical center in Bismarck, North Dakota, where hospital personnel removed the lead pellet from his face. But the harrowing ordeal was only beginning.

Law enforcement officers and hospital staff concealed Mitchell’s whereabouts from family members and supporters, who spent a frantic day and a half searching for him, multiple witnesses say. When a group of family members and legal workers finally discovered him on the hospital’s fourth floor, he was unconscious and shackled to a gurney.

More than 18 months later, Mitchell is being prosecuted in relation to the incident, even as the police officers involved appear to have faced no repercussions. He faces class A misdemeanor charges of criminal trespass and obstruction of a government function, which carry a collective maximum sentence of two years in prison and a $6,000 fine. His trial is scheduled for 8 November in Mandan, North Dakota.

The Morton county sheriff’s department declined a request to comment on this story, citing Mitchell’s forthcoming trial.

Mitchell has permanently lost all five senses on the left side of his face. Nerves and discs in the back of his head are severely damaged. According to a neurologist who diagnosed him, he probably has only two to three years before his neck snaps, rendering him paraplegic.

As police officers kneeled atop him, torquing his arms behind his back to place him in handcuffs, he says he felt like he was drowning in his own blood. He thought he might be on the verge of death. “I thought of my family, I thought of my relatives,” Mitchell says.

Mitchell’s injury is one of the most gruesome to occur during the months-long struggle against the Dakota Access pipeline (DAPL), which drew tens of thousands to the northern Great Plains but was met with oft-ruthless repression by police and private security officers.

Mitchell was initially reluctant to draw attention to his experience, he says, but as the battle against the pipeline continues to inspire indigenous-led struggles against resource extraction, including fights against pipelines from Louisiana to British Columbia, he is now ready to tell his story to the world.

“People in the movement need to know what happened to me,” he says.

Two months before Mitchell was shot, he was studying mechanical engineering at Northern Arizona University when several classmates showed him live streams of police spraying DAPL opponents with water hoses amid sub-freezing temperatures and shooting them with rubber bullets and concussion grenades. The following day, he dropped out of school and hitchhiked to North Dakota. He played numerous roles at the Oceti Sakowin (Seven Fires) Camp, including medic and fire-tender.

The night of Mitchell’s injury marked a turning point in the police’s treatment of the activists known as water protectors. Several participants who spoke to the Guardian feel that police became unrestrained in their brutality because Donald Trump, who has often encouraged violence against his political opponents, was to be inaugurated the following day.

“I was out there on every frontline action, and I saw and felt a whole different energy from the police that night,” says the Oglala Lakota water protector Candi Brings Plenty, who was part of the Oceti Sakowin Camp for six months.

The police arrested 21 people, including Mitchell. After a paramedic sedated him, he awoke in the middle of the surgery to remove the pellet from his eye. While Mitchell was shackled to his bed, two North Dakota bureau of criminal investigations officers questioned him, legal filings show. Mitchell says their questions concerned the possibility of weapons in the water protector camps and protesters’ upcoming plans.

“I was drugged out of my mind by the medications,” Mitchell says. “For almost the whole time I was in the hospital, I couldn’t even speak for myself, but they still interrogated me.”

In the meantime, supporters began worrying after Mitchell failed to appear at an arraignment hearing several hours after his arrest. “We started to get concerned that they had basically disappeared this person,” says Garrett Fitzgerald, a volunteer legal worker from Minnesota who helped track down Mitchell.

Friends and legal workers, including Fitzgerald, called around to the sheriffs, the jail and the state’s attorney, all of whom claimed not to know Mitchell’s whereabouts. When the group visited the Sanford medical center, staff claimed to have no record of him in their system. Mitchell says a nurse had removed the phone in his room to prevent him from making calls.

“Sometimes, when patients are in custody, law enforcement will choose not to have them listed in our medical directory or take other measures for security purposes,” a Sanford health center spokesman, John Berg, said.

An armed security guard who identified himself as working for Bismarck-Mandan Security Inc was stationed in Mitchell’s room. Mitchell says he eventually convinced the guard to let him borrow a cellphone, allowing him to phone his grandmother, after which a family member posted his location on Facebook. When legal workers and family members arrived, the security guard told them the Morton county sheriff’s office had directed him not to allow any visitors. But he soon agreed to un-cuff Mitchell from his bed.

After Mitchell’s supporters transported him to Minnesota for further medical treatment, the Morton county sheriff responded by issuing an arrest warrant. It was later quashed by a North Dakota judge.

“I think what happened to Marcus was just as brutal, if not more brutal, than any other injury that the police caused at Standing Rock,” says the Cheyenne River Sioux tribal member Joye Braun, an organizer with the Indigenous Environmental Network who was injured by police during the same demonstration. “And it’s made even worse because they kidnapped him.”

Since leaving Standing Rock, Mitchell has volunteered for the Black Mesa Water Coalition, a not-for-profit organization that opposes coal strip mining and supports the cultural survival of people living in an area of the Navajo Nation known as Black Mesa.

Mitchell’s trial is among the final ones scheduled in relation to the DAPL project. The prosecution alleges that Mitchell trespassed on a bridge when it was closed to the public and “obstructed law enforcement” as it was attempting to clear people from the bridge.

Despite the trauma of his experience, Mitchell says the sacrifices he has made are worth it to stand up for the earth and for indigenous self-determination.

“I don’t want my grandchildren to live in a world that’s barren and dead,” Mitchell says. “I want them to live in a world that’s fertile and full of water. I don’t want to tell my grandchildren that I did nothing.”


RELATED;
Judge's decision on Dakota Access study likely months away



Marcus Mitchell, a Standing Rock activist, lost all five senses on the left side of his face after a sheriff’s deputy shot him with a bean bag pellet.
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File Type: jpg Standing Rock activists.jpg (565.5 KB, 4 views)
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Default Re: Natives Pipeline Fight > LAND Needs WATER-NOT OIL

Canada Won’t Appeal Pipeline Ruling

The government says it will commit to extensive consultations with indigenous groups affected by the pipeline expansion

Wall St Journal 4 Oct 2018




.

Canada’s Federal Court of Appeal ruled in August that the government didn’t adequately carry out its constitutional duty to consult with affected indigenous communities. Above, protesters in British Columbia in March. Photo: jason redmond/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images




OTTAWA—Canada said Wednesday it would waive its right to appeal a court ruling that blocked work to expand the existing Trans Mountain pipeline, arguing it would unnecessarily delay government efforts to complete the energy project.

The Liberal government also unveiled plans to kick-start a new round of consultations with indigenous groups, whose lawsuits led to the latest setback to Canada’s efforts to add to limited pipeline capacity.

The difficulty domestic producers face to move their crude to the U.S. and other foreign markets is weighing on the price of western Canadian crude, which now trades at a significant discount compared with global benchmarks such as Brent and West Texas Intermediate.

In August, Canada’s Federal Court of Appeal annulled regulatory approval for the pipeline project, which envisages nearly tripling the amount of landlocked crude oil that can be moved from the province of Alberta to a Pacific coast port, where it can be loaded on tankers and transported to faster-growing economies in Asia.

In the ruling, the appeal court said the government didn’t adequately carry out its constitutional duty to consult with affected indigenous communities, and the energy regulator relied on a study that didn’t fully consider the impact of increased oil-tanker traffic on the environment.

Wednesday’s decision to waive its right to appeal and restart such consultations is the latest move by the Liberal government to get construction going on the project following the court judgment. Last month, the government instructed the country’s energy regulator to conduct another review in the span of 22 weeks, or 5½ months, with a focus on the impact of increased oil-tanker traffic on the Pacific coast.

Prior to a Wednesday morning Liberal Party caucus meeting, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said an appeal “would take another few years” before construction could start. He said a blueprint laid out in the court ruling on how Ottawa should proceed with Trans Mountain “will allow us to get things done quicker and get our resources to new markets other than the U.S. in a more rapid fashion.”

The Liberal government purchased the Trans Mountain pipeline project in May for 4.5 billion Canadian dollars ($3.51 billion) after Kinder Morgan Inc., the original owner, threatened to abandon expansion plans due to political and legal uncertainty. At the time of the acquisition, Canada said completing the pipeline expansion was in the national interest, while adding it didn’t intend to be a long-term owner of the asset.

Construction on the pipeline expansion was immediately halted following the appeal-court ruling.

The initiatives to date from Canada demonstrate “tangible and substantial ways that our government will follow on our duty to consult on the Trans Mountain pipeline in the right way” in the aftermath of the appeal court ruling, Amarjeet Sohi, Canada’s natural resources minister, said at a news conference in the nation’s capital.

“We are not going to presuppose what we are going to hear from indigenous communities. We are going to listen very carefully,” Mr. Sohi said. “And if there are appropriate accommodations to emerge, those will be considered.”

Mr. Sohi declined to put a timeline on how long consultations with the affected 117 indigenous groups would take. He acknowledged some indigenous communities would likely remain opposed to the project following talks, due to the threat the pipeline project poses to their livelihood, which involves fishing off the coastline in British Columbia, Canada’s westernmost province.

Canada’s record on getting major energy infrastructure projects like pipelines completed is fraught with setbacks. Two pipeline projects, championed by Enbridge Inc. and TransCanada Corp. , were scrapped this decade due to local opposition in affected regions. Economists at Bank of Nova Scotia have estimated Canada’s insufficient pipeline capacity costs the economy nearly C$16 billion a year, or 0.75% of economic output.

The lack of pipeline capacity is prompting producers to rely heavily on rail to ship their crude. Last week, Cenovus Energy Inc. announced it signed deals with Canada’s main railway operators that will see the amount of crude oil exported by rail rise substantially, to 100,000 barrels a day, in the coming months.
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