Go Back   DreamTeamDownloads1, FTP Help, Movies, Bollywood, Applications, etc. & Mature Sex Forum, Rapidshare, Filefactory, Freakshare, Rapidgator, Turbobit, & More MULTI Filehosts > World News/Sport/Weather > Earths' Enigmas/Astronomy/UFOs/Science/Health/Animals

Earths' Enigmas/Astronomy/UFOs/Science/Health/Animals Read & Enjoy Many Interesting Articles in Here About our World -From the Past, Present & Future- Astronomy, Science and Technology, Archaeology, UFOs & Animals ..

IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT
Hallo to All Members. As you can see we regularly Upgrade our Servers, (Sorry for any Downtime during this). We also have added more Forums to help you with many things and for you to enjoy. We now need you to help us to keep this site up and running. This site works at a loss every month and we appeal to you to donate what you can. If you would like to help us, then please just send a message to any Member of Staff for info on how to do this,,,, & Thank You for Being Members of this site.
Post New ThreadReply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-10-13, 21:09   #1
 
Ladybbird's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 34,907
Thanks: 23,573
Thanked 12,735 Times in 8,571 Posts
Ladybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond repute

Awards Showcase
Best Admin Best Admin Gold Medal Gold Medal 
Total Awards: 6

Smile Stunning Stellar Array of Astronomical Pictures

Pictures that really are out of this world: Stellar array of winning images from Astronomy Photographer of the Year


  • Thousands of photographers from around the world entered the Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition
  • Stunning images capture numerous astronomical phenomenon, including eclipse of the sun and meteor showers
  • Mark Gee from Australia won the top prize for his photograph of the Milky Way over the Cape Palliser, New Zealand
  • Collection will be exhibited at the Royal Observatory’s Astronomy Centre in Greenwich from today
By Daily Mail UK


From a remarkable meteor shower to stunning pictures of the swirling gases and galaxies in deep space, these are just a few of the phenomenal images entered into this year's Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition.
Over a thousand amateur and professional photographers from around the world entered the competition, but Australian Mark Gee won the top prize for his beautiful image of the sky over the southern hemisphere, decorated with a number of astronomical highlights.

The shot shows central regions of the Milky Way Galaxy - over 26,000 light years away - appearing as a tangle of dust and stars, lit up by a lighthouse on the Cape Palliser, New Zealand, shining out to sea.




Winning shot: Mark Gee's image of the Milky Way came first in the Earth and Space Category as well as being voted overall winner




Stunning: Fredrik Broms from Norway was voted runner-up for this beautiful picture of the Aurora Borealis




Night sky: Fredrik Broms was also highly commended in the category for this image of the Comet Panstarrs over the mountains in his native Norway




Extraordinary: American David Kingham's image of a Perseid Meteor Shower over a mountain range was also highly commended


In the top left corner of the picture are two Magellanic Clouds, or small satellite galaxies in orbit around the Milky Way, which look like two round smudges in Mr Gee's image.
Framing the photograph is the rugged landscape of the cape, which looks almost like the surface of a distant planet in itself.

Mr Gee, who won Ł1,500 for his incredible picture, impressed the judges with the depth and clarity of his winning shot.
Judge and Royal Observatory Public Astronomer, Dr. Marek Kukula said: 'I love the tranquil combination of sea and sky in this beautiful image, along with the comforting human element of the cliff-top lighthouse.




Surreal: Spaniard Dani Caxete's image shows a quadruple lunar halo illuminating the landscape below




Far away: An image of the Celestial Impasto, a star formation composed off dust and gas, taken by American Adam Block




Deep space: Ivan Eder, from Hungary, took this wonderful shot of M81 and M82 galaxies - twelve million light years from Earth




Dust cloud: The Rho Ophiuchi and Antares Nebulae cloud complex - a dark nebula of gas - taken by Tom O'Donoghue


'This view from the shores of New Zealand makes me think of the long voyages the Maori's ancestors made into unchartered oceans, guided by the stars. We're in a similar situation today, as we set out to explore the Universe.'
Mr Gee was crowned both overall winner and winner of the Earth and Space category.
There were six other categories, including Deep Space, Our Solar System, People and Space, Robotic Scope Image of the Year, Young Astronomy Photographer of the Year and the Sir Patrick Moore prize for Best Newcomer.

Runner-up in the Earth and Space category was a striking vision of a green Aurora Borealis captured by Fredrik Broms from Norway.




Cluster: Omega Centauri - a spherical cloud containing several million stars taken by Ignacio Diaz Bobillo from Argentina




Haunting: A Corona Composite - or eclipse of the sun - taken in 2012 in Australia by Man-To Hui




Spectacular: Winning the Sir Partick Moore prize for Best Newcomer was Sam Cornwell for his image of the transit of Venus


The beautiful image clearly shows the shapes and forms of the Aurora Borealis as they are moulded by the Earth’s complex magnetic field above Grřtfjord in Norway.
The photographer was also highly commended for his image of Comet Panstarrs over Norway's snow-topped mountains.

A breath-taking total eclipse of the Sun, sometimes called a ‘cosmic coincidence’ due to the similar apparent sizes of the Sun and Moon, taken by Man-To Hui from China won the Our Solar System category.

Adam Block won the Deep Space category for his image of star-formation Celestial Impasto with Ireland's Tom O'Donoghue winning runner up for his picture of gas and dust cloud complex Rho Ophiuchi and Antares Nebulae, appearing like spots of ink floating through water.

Briton Sam Cornwell took first place in the newly renamed Sir Patrick Moor prize for Best Newcomer for his ghostly, visceral depiction of the 2012 Transit of Venus - which will not take place again until 2117.




Double: Overall winner Mark Gee also won the People and Space Category for this image of a group of individuals silhouetted against the moon




Alight: Jia Hao's 'Ring of Fire Sequence' showing an 'annular eclipse' in which a ring of the sun remains visible


Teenager Jacob Marchio from the USA impressed the judges with two images.

The first was a portrait of a waxing crescent Moon and the second a moody picture of the Milky Way Galaxy rendered with a dusky brown colour palette, which won the 14-year-old the accolade of Young Astronomy Photographer of the Year.

From today, the best of these exceptional photographs will be showcased in a free exhibition in the Royal Observatory’s Astronomy Centre.

BBC Sky at Night Magazine’s Editor Chris Bramley, who is a judge for the competition, said of this year’s contest: 'With more entries than ever, and so many displaying superb compositions and a spectacular eye for detail, the judges faced a real challenge this year.

'The exhibition will really show the drama and majesty of the night skies – never has our cosmos been captured so beautifully!'




Expanse: A dark lane of dust marks the plane of the Milky Way in this photograph taken by Ben Canales


Quote:
ASTRONOMY PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR: FULL LIST OF COMPETITION WINNERS

Earth and Space
• Mark Gee (Australia) with Guiding Light to the Stars (Winner and Overall Winner)
• Fredrik Broms (Norway) with Green Energy (Runner-up)
• Dani Caxete (Spain) with A Quadruple Lunar Halo (Highly Commended)
• Fredrik Broms (Norway) with Icy Visitor (Highly Commended)
• David Kingham (USA) with Snowy Range Perseid Meteor Shower (Highly Commended)

Deep Space
• Adam Block (USA) with Celestial Impasto: Sh2 - 239 (Winner)
• Tom O’Donoghue (Ireland) with Rho Ophiuchi and Antares Nebulae (Runner-Up)
• Ignacio Diaz Bobillo (Argentina) with Omega Centauri (Highly Commended)
• Ivan Eder (Hungary) with M81-82 and Integrated Flux Nebula (Highly Commended)
• Michael Sidonio (Australia) with Floating Metropolis-NGC 253 (Highly Commended)

Our Solar System
• Man-To Hui (China) with Corona Composite of 2012: Australian Totality (Winner)
• Alan Friedman (USA) with Magnetic Maelstrom (Runner-Up)
• Ignacio Diaz Bobillo (Argentina) with Cosmic Alignment: Comet Lemmon, GC 47 Tucanae and the SMC (Highly Commended)
• Jia Hao (Singapore) with Ring of Fire Sequence (Highly Commended)
• Damian Peach (UK) with Saturn at Opposition (Highly Commended)

Young Astronomy Photographer of the Year
• Jacob Marchio (USA, aged 14) with The Milky Way Galaxy (Winner)
• Ariana Bernal (USA, aged 10) with Goodbye Sun, Hello Moon (Runner-up)
• Samuel Copley (UK, aged 15) with The Great Nebula (Highly Commended)
• Eric Dewar (Canada, aged 15) with The Windows District (Highly Commended)
• Jacob Marchio (USA, aged 14) with The Waxing Crescent Moon (Highly Commended)

Special Prize: People and Space
• Mark Gee (Australia) with Moon Silhouettes (Winner)
• Ben Canales (USA) with Hi.Hello (Runner-up)

Special Prize: Sir Patrick Moore prize for Best Newcomer
• Sam Cornwell (UK) with Venus Transit, Foxhunters Grave, Welsh Highlands (Winner)

Robotic Scope Image of the Year
• László Francsics (Hungary) with The Trapezium Cluster and Surrounding Nebula (Winner)
__________________
Nil Carborundum Illegitemi My Advice is Free My Friendship is Priceless

FREEBIES Continue to be a BURDEN on Our Increasing Server/Privacy Costs. Please DONATE Something to HELP...PM an Admin for Further Info.



& Thanks to Those That Have Taken The Time to Register & Become a Member of ... 1...
Ladybbird is online now  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Ladybbird For This Useful Post:
FreaknDavid (05-10-13)
Old 04-10-13, 21:33   #2
 
Ladybbird's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 34,907
Thanks: 23,573
Thanked 12,735 Times in 8,571 Posts
Ladybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond repute

Awards Showcase
Best Admin Best Admin Gold Medal Gold Medal 
Total Awards: 6

Default Re: Stunning Stellar Array of Astronomical Pictures

Up close and personal with the 'ring of fire': Amazing pictures show SPACE was the best place to watch rare annular eclipse


By Daily Mail UK

Skygazers around the world excitedly gathered outside to watch the rare annular eclipse, which produces a 'ring of fire' around the sun, when it swept across Asia and the western United States on Sunday evening.
But these incredible pictures show that all those Earth-bound astronomy fans had it wrong, and that the best vantage point from which to examine the unusual phenomenon was in fact space, where the view could not be impeded by pesky obstructions such as clouds.
The photographs were taken by the Japanese-owned Hinode telescope satellite, which orbits the Earth but is constantly pointed at the Sun, allowing for permanent observation of the body at the centre of our solar system.
Along with the stunning images, a video has emerged which shows the progress of the moon across the face of the sun, captured by photographer Cory Poole who edited together 700 separate photographs taken with his telescope.

Scroll down for video



Ideal vantage point: Some of the most stunning pictures of Sunday's annular eclipse were taken from space





Satellite: These images were taken by the Japanese-owned Hinode telescope which is constantly pointed at the sun




Ring of fire: This satellite image captures the moment where the moon covered nearly the entire face of the sun


But the view wasn't too bad from Earth, as the moon slowly 'bit into' the sun, creating incredible visual effects such as a golden heart gleaming through branches in Los Angeles.
The annular eclipse, in which the moon passes in front of the sun leaving only a golden ring around its edges, created incredible visual effects around the world - and photographers let their technical imaginations run wild with 'trick' shots such as this heart-shaped sun.

The 'classic' view of an annular eclipse is as a burning ring. In the U.S., viewing parties were held at observatories in Reno, Nevada, and Oakland, California, and elsewhere.
In some areas, special camera filters for taking photographs have been sold out for weeks in anticipation of the big event.



A branch foregrounds the heart shaped sun during an annular solar eclipse seen from Los Angeles




Hikers watch an annular eclipse from Papago Park in Phoenix





A small bird rests at a powerline backgrounded by an annular solar eclipse seen from Los Angeles




Scottsdale, America: The moon is pictured as it passes between the earth and the sun briefly blocking out most of the sun's surface




A thundershower rolls through as an annular solar eclipse appears in Gardnerville, Nevada




The eclipse in Wisconsin: The 'annular eclipse' in which the moon passes in front of the sun leaving only a golden ring around its edges, was visible to wide areas across China, Japan and elsewhere in the region before moving across the Pacific to be seen in parts of the western United States




A plane flies past an annular solar eclipse from Taguig city, east of Manila, Philippines





An annular solar eclipse appears above a Ferris wheel in the sky over Yokohama near Tokyo




An annular eclipse appears at a waterfront park in Yokohama, near Tokyo




The annular eclipse is visible through binoculars in Sacramento, California





The ring of fire: the rare annular eclipse as seen from Albequerqe, New Mexico, one of the western states where it was most visible





Stunning: The unusual event stood out against the evening sky in Odessa, Texas




Partial eclipse: The moon moving between the earth and the sun, blocking out some of the light




Clear: Cloudless skies above the Grand Canyon allowed observers a great view of the astronomic event


WHAT CAUSES THE 'RING OF FIRE'? ANNULAR ECLIPSES EXPLAINED

Not every eclipse of the Sun is a total eclipse. On occasion the Moon is too small to cover the whole of the Sun. This is because of the Moon's orbit around Earth which is oval or elliptical in shape.

As the Moon orbits Earth its distance varies from about 221,000 to 252,000 miles. This 13 per cent variant makes its apparent size, from our perspective, vary by the same amount.

If an eclipse occurs while the Moon is on the far side of its elliptical orbit, it appears smaller than the Sun and can't completely cover it - creating the 'ring of fire' effect due this weekend.

In Japan, 'eclipse tours' were arranged at schools and parks, on pleasure boats and even private airplanes. Similar events were held in China and Taiwan as well, with skywatchers warned to protect their eyes.
People from Colorado, Oklahoma and as far away as Canada traveled to Albuquerque to enjoy one of the best vantage points at a park on the edge of the city.
Members of the crowd smiled and cheered and children yelled with excitement as the moon crossed the sun and the blazing halo of light began to form. Some watched the eclipse by placing their viewing glasses on the front of their smartphones.
Eventually, the moon centered and covered about 96 percent of the sun.

'That's got to be the prettiest thing I've ever seen,' said Brent Veltri of Salida, Colorado.

At the Taipei Astronomical Museum in Taiwan, the spectacle emerged from dark clouds for only about 30 seconds. But the view was nearly perfect against Manila's orange skies.

'It's amazing. We do this for the awe [and] it has not disappointed. I am awed, literally floored,' said astronomical hobbyist Garry Andreassen, whose long camera lenses were lined up with those of about 10 other gazers in a downtown Manila park.
Hong Kong skywatchers weren't so lucky.



Excitement: A family watches the eclipse from Chico, California - with the precaution of special lenses





Hi-tech: A man uses a special film to protect his tablet computer as he photographs the eclipse




Even pets need protection: A dog decked out in stylish but practical eyewear to enable him to watch the eclipse from Tokyo


The eclipse was broadcast live on TV in Tokyo, where such an eclipse hasn't been visible since 1839.
Japanese TV crews watched from the top of Mount Fuji and even staked out a zoo south of Tokyo to capture the reaction of the chimpanzees - who didn't seem to notice.
A light rain fell on Tokyo as the eclipse began, but the clouds thinned as it reached its peak, providing near perfect conditions.
'It was a very mysterious sight,' said Kaori Sasaki, who joined a crowd in downtown Tokyo to watch event. 'I've never seen anything like it.'



Progression: This image shows how the sky changed above the Pueblo Bonito ancient building at Chaco Culture National Historical Park in Nageezi, Arizona




Phases: A composite image of the annular eclipse as seen from Tokyo on Sunday night




The big C: The annular solar eclipse is spotted in the sky above Chandler, Arizona





Fire in the sky: This photo shows the solar eclipse from downtown Fort Worth, Texas

Several hundred people gathered along the Kowloon waterfront on Hong Kong's famed Victoria Harbor, most of them students or commuters on their way to work.

The eclipse was already underway as the sun began to rise, but heavy clouds obstructed the view.
The eclipse followed a narrow 8,500-mile path for 3 1/2 hours. The ring phenomenon lasted about five minutes, depending on location.

People outside the narrow band for prime viewing saw a partial eclipse.
'Ring of Fire' eclipses are not as dramatic as a total eclipse, when the disc of the sun is entirely blocked by the moon. The moon is too far from Earth and appears too small in the sky to blot out the sun completely.



What a sight: An aeroplane flies past the annular solar eclipse from Taguig city, east of Manila, Philippines




Light show: The eclipse is seen reflected in a pool of water in Beijing, China







Awe: From the astronomy student, left, to the gaggle of schoolboys, right, no one could keep their eyes of the phenomenon


Doctors and education officials have warned of eye injuries from improper viewing.

Before the event started, Japan's Education Minister Hirofumi Hirano demonstrated how to use eclipse glasses in a televised news conference.
Police also cautioned against traffic accidents - warning drivers to keep their eyes on the road.


Sky stunner: The solar eclipse, in which the moon passes in front of the sun leaving only a golden ring around its edges, is seen briefly during a break in clouds over Taipei, Taiwan



'I've never seen anything like it': A partial eclipse is seen from Tokyo as the sun and moon aligned over the earth in the rare astronomical event




View: A plane flies above the annular solar eclipse in a stunning image from Irving, Texas


Path: The eclipse begins in eastern Asia on Monday then crosses the north Pacific to end in western U.S.


Watch the stunning time-lapse video





YouTube: mrcorypoole
__________________
Nil Carborundum Illegitemi My Advice is Free My Friendship is Priceless

FREEBIES Continue to be a BURDEN on Our Increasing Server/Privacy Costs. Please DONATE Something to HELP...PM an Admin for Further Info.



& Thanks to Those That Have Taken The Time to Register & Become a Member of ... 1...
Ladybbird is online now  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Ladybbird For This Useful Post:
FreaknDavid (05-10-13)
Post New ThreadReply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.5.2
Designed by: vBSkinworks