Go Back   DreamTeamDownloads1, FTP Help, Movies, Bollywood, Applications, etc. & Mature Sex Forum, Rapidshare, Filefactory, Freakshare, Rapidgator, Turbobit, & More MULTI Filehosts > World News/Sport/Weather > Earths' Enigmas/Astronomy/UFOs/Science/Health/Animals

Earths' Enigmas/Astronomy/UFOs/Science/Health/Animals Read & Enjoy Many Interesting Articles in Here About our World -From the Past, Present & Future- Astronomy, Science and Technology, Archaeology, UFOs & Animals ..

IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT
Hallo to All Members. As you can see we regularly Upgrade our Servers, (Sorry for any Downtime during this). We also have added more Forums to help you with many things and for you to enjoy. We now need you to help us to keep this site up and running. This site works at a loss every month and we appeal to you to donate what you can. If you would like to help us, then please just send a message to any Member of Staff for info on how to do this,,,, & Thank You for Being Members of this site.
Post New ThreadReply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 25-10-16, 08:50   #1
 
Ladybbird's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 34,910
Thanks: 23,575
Thanked 12,735 Times in 8,571 Posts
Ladybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond reputeLadybbird has a reputation beyond repute

Awards Showcase
Best Admin Best Admin Gold Medal Gold Medal 
Total Awards: 6

Earth The Black Sea's 'Dead Zone' Reveals 40 Ottoman and Byzantine Shipwrecks

The Black Sea's 'Dead Zone' has Preserved 40 Ottoman and Byzantine Shipwrecks -
Ghost Fleet: Explorers Accidentally Find a Graveyard of More Than 40 Perfectly Preserved Ancient Shipwrecks at the Bottom of The Black Sea

  • The Black Sea Maritime Archaeology Project has been scouring the sea bed of the Black Sea
  • The primary focus is to carry out geophysical surveys, but over 40 shipwrecks have also been found
  • They are 'astonishingly well preserved' due to the lack of oxygen in the Black Sea's 'dead zone'
  • The findings provide new information on the communities living on the Black Sea coast

Daily Mail UK, 25 October 2016





The Black Sea Maritime Archaeology Project involves an international team, led by the University of Southampton's Centre for Maritime Archaeology.


In the depths of the Black Sea lies a landscape of complete darkness, where there is no light and no oxygen.
Archaeologists have long believed this 'dead zone' holds of a perfectly preserved graveyard of shipwrecks.
Now, a mapping expedition has proved them right, after accidentally uncovering more than 40 ancient shipwrecks from the Ottoman and Byzantine periods.





More than 40 shipwrecks have been discovered from the Ottoman and Byzantine periods, many of which provide the first views of ship types known from historical sources. Pictured is a shipwreck from the Ottoman period



Quote:

BLACK SEA'S 'DEAD ZONE'

With no light and no oxygen in the Black Sea's lower, anoxic layer, no life can survive.
This means the environment cannot support the organisms that typically feast on organic materials, such as wood and flesh.
As a result, there is an extraordinary opportunity for preservation, including shipwrecks and the cargoes they carried.

The expedition has been scouring the waters 5,900ft (1,800 metres) below the surface of the Black Sea using an off-shore vessel equipped with some of the most advanced underwater equipment in the world.
The vessel is on an expedition mapping submerged ancient landscapes which were inundated with water following the last Ice Age.

The project, known Black Sea Maritime Archaeology Project (Black Sea MAP), involves an international team led by the University of Southampton's Centre for Maritime Archaeology.

Professor Jon Adams, principle investigator on the project, said:

'We're endeavouring to answer some hotly-debated questions about when the water level rose, how rapidly it did so and what effects it had on human populations living along this stretch of the Bulgarian coast of the Black Sea.

'The primary focus of this project is to carry out geophysical surveys to detect former land surfaces buried below the current sea bed, take core samples and characterise and date them, and create a palaeoenvironmental reconstruction of Black Sea prehistory.'


The vessel is based on board the Stril Explorer, and carries some of the most advanced underwater survey systems in the world.
The researchers are using two Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) to survey the sea bed.

One is optimised for high resolution 3D photography, while the other, called Surveyor Interceptor, 'flies' at four times the speed of conventional ROVs and carries an entire suite of geophysical instrumentation, as well as lights, high definition cameras and a laser scanner.





The researchers used two Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) to survey the sea bed. These have discovered several wrecks, including this one from the Byzantine period (pictured)





The wrecks, such as this one from the Medieval period, are astonishingly well preserved due to the anoxic conditions (absence of oxygen) of the Black Sea below 150 metres



Quote:

BLACK SEA'S HISTORY

Many of the colonial and commercial activities of ancient Greece and Rome, and of the Byzantine Empire, centred on the Black Sea.
After 1453, when the Ottoman Turks occupied Constantinople (and changed its name to Istanbul), the Black Sea was virtually closed to foreign commerce.
Nearly 400 years later, in 1856, the Treaty of Paris re-opened the sea to the commerce of all nations.

Since the project started, Surveyor Interceptor has set new records for depth at 5,900ft (1,800 metres) and sustained speed of over six knots (7mph), and has covered 1,250 kilometres (776 miles).

Among the wrecks are ships from the Ottoman and Byzantine Empires, which provide new information on the communities on the Black Sea coast.

Many of the colonial and commercial activities of ancient Greece and Rome, and of the Byzantine Empire, centred on the Black Sea.
After 1453, when the Ottoman Turks occupied Constantinople (and changed its name to Istanbul), the Black Sea was virtually closed to foreign commerce.

Nearly 400 years later, in 1856, the Treaty of Paris re-opened the sea to the commerce of all nations.

Professor Adams said:

'The wrecks are a complete bonus, but a fascinating discovery, found during the course of our extensive geophysical surveys.





The Remotely Operate Vehicles captured the shipwrecks in stunning detail, including this intricate stern of a ship from the Ottoman period





While the primary focus of the project is to carry out geophysical surveys, shipwrecks, including this one from the Ottoman period, have given new insights into how communities live on the shores of the Black Sea





The exploration vessel is based on board the Stril Explorer, and carries some of the most advanced underwater survey systems in the world


'They are astonishingly preserved due to the anoxic conditions (absence of oxygen) of the Black Sea below 150 metres.

'Using the latest 3D recording technique for underwater structures, we've been able to capture some astonishing images without disturbing the sea bed.
'We are now among the very best exponents of this practice methodology and certainly no-one has achieved models of this completeness on shipwrecks at these depths.'



Quote:

SCANNING THE BLACK SEA BED


The researchers are using two Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) to survey the sea bed.
One is optimised for high resolution 3D photography, while the other, called Surveyor Interceptor, 'flies' at four times the speed of conventional ROVs and carries an entire suite of geophysical instrumentation, as well as lights, high definition cameras and a laser scanner.

Since the project started, Surveyor Interceptor has set new records for depth (1,800 metres) and sustained speed over six knots (seven miles/hour), and has covered 1,250 kilometres (776 miles).

A collection of more than 40 shipwrecks have been discovered and inspected, many of which provide the first views of ship types never seen before.

Among the wrecks are ships from the Ottoman and Byzantine Empires, which provide new information on the communities on the Black Sea coast.




This Remotely Operated Vehicle, called the 'Work Class Supporter', which is optimised for high resolution 3D photography, is designed to capture high resolution 3D photography and video. The researchers are using two Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) to survey the sea bed.





The project has been scanning the bottom of the Black Sea, and has so far covered 1,250 kilometres (776 miles)





The Surveyor Interceptor 'flies' at four times the speed of conventional ROVs and carries an entire suite of geophysical instrumentation, as well as lights, high definition cameras and a laser scanner





Many of the colonial and commercial activities of ancient Greece and Rome, and of the Byzantine Empire, centred on the Black Sea (pictured)
__________________
Nil Carborundum Illegitemi My Advice is Free My Friendship is Priceless

FREEBIES Continue to be a BURDEN on Our Increasing Server/Privacy Costs. Please DONATE Something to HELP...PM an Admin for Further Info.



& Thanks to Those That Have Taken The Time to Register & Become a Member of ... 1...
Ladybbird is online now  
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiTweet this Post!
Reply With Quote
Post New ThreadReply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.5.2
Designed by: vBSkinworks