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Old 03-04-18, 05:00   #1
 
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Hot Canada & US Disgraceful SECRET PACT on FORCED Adoption Prog >1 Court's Decision

Creator of Sixties Scoop Adoption Program Says it Wasn't Meant to Place Kids with White Families

Adopt Indian Métis Program (AIM), Called it 'Racist/Cultural Genocide'


Jennifer Fowler · CBC News: 22 Mar, 2018






Nora Cummings, who was president of the Saskatchewan Native Women's Association, recruited hundreds of women for a meeting with the provincial minister of social services in 1973 to protest adoption ads such as these. (Connie Walker/CBC)
....


The CBC podcast Finding Cleo, with host Connie Walker, follows a family's search for Cleo Semaganis Nicotine, who was adopted out of her Saskatchewan First Nations community and sent to live in the U.S. during what became known as the Sixties Scoop. Listen to the first eight episodes and read more about the program through which Cleo was adopted, which has been denounced by some as a form "cultural genocide."



It was a devastating day in April 1973 when Lillian Semaganis, a young Cree mother whose six children had all been taken by Saskatchewan, Canada social services, opened the Saskatoon Star-Phoenix newspaper to see two of her own daughters advertised for adoption.

Her friend Nora Cummings still chokes up when she remembers the moment.

"She came out holding this newspaper, and she was crying. And she said, 'These are my babies!'"


Quote:
She came out holding this newspaper and she was crying. And she said, "These are my babies!"

- Nora Cummings, on her friend Lillian Semaganis

.


The ad featuring the smiling faces of her children was for the Saskatchewan government's Adopt Indian Métis program (A.I.M.).


Cummings, who was president of the Saskatchewan Native Women's Association at the time, was so incensed that she immediately recruited hundreds of women for a meeting with the minister of social services to protest the ads.

"The little stories that were written up [to accompany the ads] — When I look at it now, I think about when you're looking to adopt a pet" Cummings said.



Once seen as a success by the Saskatchewan government, A.I.M. is now considered to be a tragic chapter of the Canadian Sixties Scoop Adoption Program , an era in which tens of thousands of Indigenous children were taken from their families and put in foster care or adopted, mostly into white families
....


Otto Driedger, an immigrant from German descent many years ago and a former Saskatchewan director of welfare who started A.I.M. and remained with the program for two years afterward, said its only goal was finding children permanent home

"The alternative was for them to be in foster homes because of the neglect there was or the abuse that there was in families," Driedger said in his first interview about the program since he left it in the late '60s.

Placing children with white families was "not the basis of the child welfare program," he said.





This ad appeared in the Regina Leader-Post newspaper on `4 Nov.1972. (Regina Leader-Post)


"While adopting Indigenous children into white homes might not have been the goal, it was largely the result.


And 50-year-old government documents uncovered by CBC investigating the disappearance of one of Lillian Semaganis's children, Cleopatra Semaganis Nicotine, known as Cleo, detail a tense struggle between the bureaucrats behind A.I.M and Indigenous groups in Saskatchewan who called the adoption program "racist" and an act of "cultural genocide."


Listen to Episode 6:

A closer look at Cleo's early life in Little Pine First Nation


You can listen to more EPs Here;

http://www.cbc.ca/radio/findingcleo/listen-to-missing-murdered-finding-cleo-1.4557887

.
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Old 07-06-18, 03:08   #2
 
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Update Re: Canada's Disgraceful Sixties FORCED Adoption Prog>Survivors Unhappy By Court Deci

Canada's Disgraceful Sixties Scoop Adoption Prog. >Survivors Unhappy @ $875M Offer By Court..

Parents Lost Their Children. Children Lost Their Parents..
> Justice was Not Served..

Hearing in Saskatoon saw more than 100 survivors testify

CBC News. Updated 6 Jun, 2018

An $875-million settlement for survivors of the Sixties Scoop has been approved, following an emotional two-day hearing in Saskatoon.

Federal Court Judge Michel Shore said he had exhaustively studied submissions for the settlement for the past year, which includes $750 million for the estimated 20,000 survivors, $50 million for a foundation and $75 million for lawyers' fees.

"I'm very pleased.... I think it's the right direction for Canada," said lawyer Tony Merchant, who represents 5,000 survivors.

However, the decision didn't sit well with many survivors who had come from across North America to testify. They say the outcome seemed pre-determined.

They noted Shore made multiple references promoting the settlement and its foundation during the hearing. They railed against the three-minute time limit they were given to testify. And Shore's decision issued after only 60 minutes of deliberation was the final proof he wasn't listening to anyone at the hearing, they said.

"Was this just to shut us up? There is no integrity in this process. Justice was not served," said survivor Marlene Orgeron, a member of the Sapotaweyak Cree Nation in Manitoba who was adopted out to a family in New Orleans.

"I don't feel I was heard. Our words just fell from the air."

Survivor Sandra Relling from Alberta said the decision "came far too soon.
"I don't believe it was a fair hearing. I think it was biased. I'm tired of the leaders of this country telling me what's in my best interest. I feel victimized again."
The Saskatoon Federal Court hearing was to grant approval for the national settlement. An Ontario hearing scheduled for the end of this month regarding claimants in part of that province will also be required for full implementation.
Shore said the administrator of the funds must disseminate and communicate details of compensation and services.


Judge's Remarks Called 'Inappropriate'



Earlier in the day, some survivors of the Sixties Scoop had questioned the fitness of Shore to oversee the hearing.
During his 16-minute opening remarks on Friday morning in a Saskatoon hotel ballroom, some survivors in the gallery shook their heads while others walked out.
"I was disgusted; I had to leave," said survivor Peter Van Name, from Mikisew Cree First Nation, Alta.
Van Name, Melissa Parkin and other survivors said Shore was supposed to be objective, but had made multiple references in favour of the settlement. On Friday morning, the second day of the hearing, he appeared to promote the benefits of a foundation proposed as part of the deal, saying that's the best way people can have their stories heard.


"You need a tailor-made solution for you. We hope the foundation can recognize that," Shore said.

Van Name, who grew up with an adopted family in New Jersey, said the statements were inappropriate.

"It doesn't matter what I think now," he said. "They've already made their decision." .. The US & Canada made a deal > we have no chance to ever win..




From the late 1950s through the 1980s, thousands of First Nations and Métis children were apprehended by child welfare authorities and placed in non-Indigenous care in what has become known as the Sixties Scoop.

More than 100 survivors from across Canada, as well as dozens of lawyers, government officials and security officers, hoped to testify at the two-day hearing. It was moved from the courthouse to a hotel to accommodate the large crowds.

There were other comments from Shore on Friday that angered survivors.

Shore told the gallery non-Indigenous people were harmed more than Indigenous survivors by the Sixties Scoop and other historic events because they caused non-Indigenous people to lose their reverence for the land and nature.

Shore made references to "barbarians eating fruit in trees," Nelson Mandela, and compared himself to a heart surgeon.

At one point, he said he'd stop speaking because he knew survivors had to stick to a three-minute time limit, but then continued speaking for several minutes.

"I'm taking all this time for one reason — a judge is a human being, lawyers are human beings," said Shore, repeating several times he understands the pain survivors are feeling.

Shore took his seat, and the rest of Friday morning saw lawyers speaking about the legal details and their fees.

"He talked like that for how many minutes and we get three? We get nothing," Van Name said.

Other survivors who spoke Thursday and Friday were upset by the process and the time limits. They said it felt like they were being lectured.
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Old 07-06-18, 06:46   #3
 
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Update Re: Canada & US Disgraceful SECRET PACT on FORCED Adoption Prog >1 Court's Decision

Canada's Disgraceful Sixties Scoop Adoption Prog..Children SOLD To the US. > Survivors Unhappy @ $875M Offer By Court..

Parents Lost Their Children. Children Lost Their Parents..
> Justice was Not Served.. No Amount of Money Can Ever Stop the Pain of Parents Trying to Find Their Lost Children & Children Trying to Find Their Families...

ALL RECORDS WERE BLOCKED by both Canada & the US...

Hearing in Saskatoon allowed only 100 survivors testify

CBC News. > Updated 6 Jun, 2018


An $875-million settlement for survivors of the Sixties Scoop has been approved, following an emotional two-day hearing in Saskatoon.


Federal Court Judge Michel Shore said he had exhaustively studied submissions for the settlement for the past year, which includes $750 million for the estimated 20,000 survivors, > (still not received by them ) nor the $50 million for their foundation.... BUT the $75 million for lawyers' fees has been paid....


However, the decision didn't sit well with many survivors who had come from across North America to testify. They say the outcome seemed pre-determined.


They noted Judge Michel Shore made multiple references promoting the settlement and its foundation during the hearing.


They railed against the three-minute time limit they were given to testify.


And Shore's decision issued after only 60 minutes of deliberation was the final proof he wasn't listening to anyone at the hearing, they said.


"Was this just to shut us up? There is no integrity in this process. Justice was not served," said survivor Marlene Orgeron, a member of the Sapotaweyak Cree Nation in Manitoba who was adopted out to a family in New Orleans.

"I don't feel I was heard. Our words just fell from the air."


Survivor Sandra Relling from Alberta said the decision "came far too soon.
"I don't believe it was a fair hearing. I think it was biased. I'm tired of the leaders of this country & the US telling me what's in my best interest. I feel victimized again."

AFTER MANY YEARS WHY ARE RECORDS OF US TRYING TO FIND OUR CHILDREN & THEM TRYING FIND US BLOCKED by Both CANADA & THE US ?


The Saskatoon Federal Court hearing was to grant approval for the national settlement. An Ontario hearing scheduled for the end of this month regarding claimants in part of that province will also be required for full implementation.

Shore said the administrator of the funds must disseminate and communicate details of compensation and services.


Judge's Remarks Called 'Inappropriate'


Earlier in the day, some survivors of the Sixties Scoop had questioned the fitness of Shore to oversee the hearing.

During Judge Shore 16-minute opening remarks in a Saskatoon hotel ballroom, after a dinner, some survivors in the gallery shook their heads while others walked out.

"I was disgusted; I had to leave," said survivor Peter Van Name, from Mikisew Cree First Nation, Alta.

Van Name, Melissa Parkin and other survivors said Shore was supposed to be objective, but had made multiple references in favour of the settlement.

On the second day of the hearing, he appeared to promote the benefits of a foundation proposed as part of the deal, saying that's the best way people can have their stories heard.

"You need a tailor-made solution for you. We hope the foundation can recognize that," Shore said.


Van Name, who grew up with an adopted family in New Jersey, said the statements were inappropriate.

"It doesn't matter what I think now," he said. "They've already made their decision." ..

The US & Canada made a deal > we have no chance to ever win..



From the late 1950s through the 1980s, thousands of First Nations and Métis children were taken by police & 'child welfare' authorities and placed in non-Indigenous care in what has become known as the Sixties Scoop.

More than 100 survivors from across Canada, as well as dozens of lawyers, government officials and security officers, hoped to testify at the two-day hearing. It was moved from the courthouse to a hotel to accommodate the large crowds.


There were other comments from Shore that angered survivors.

Shore told the gallery non-Indigenous people were harmed more than Indigenous survivors by the Sixties Scoop and other historic events because they caused non-Indigenous people to lose their reverence for the land and nature.


Judge Shore also made references to "barbarians eating fruit in trees," like Nelson Mandela, and compared himself to a heart surgeon.


At one point, he said he'd stop speaking because he knew survivors had to stick to a three-minute time limit, but then continued speaking for several minutes.

"I'm taking all this time for one reason — a judge is a human being, lawyers are human beings," said Shore, repeating several times he understands the pain survivors are feeling.


Shore took his seat, and the rest of Friday morning saw lawyers speaking about the legal details and their fees.

"He talked like that for how many minutes and we get three? We get nothing," Van Name said.

Other survivors who spoke Thursday and Friday were upset by the process and the time limits. They said it felt like they were being lectured.


'It's a Sham'


"This is just furthering the injustice; why are we even here?" White Bear First Nation member Anna Parent told CBC News, after the first day of hearings.

"Everyone is offended. It's a sham."
"We have said from the beginning that this is a significant step but not the last step," reads a statement from the Office of the Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations.

"We know there are other claims that remain unresolved, including those of the Métis and non-status. We remain committed to working with all Indigenous peoples affected by the Sixties Scoop to resolve the remaining litigation through negotiation."

Survivors hope the money, the services and the acknowledgement of wrongdoing will help survivors and their families heal. Others say the deal is flawed, but will not stop their pain, but it's the best option available.

For those opposed to the proposed settlement, the maximum $50,000 payment per survivor is not nearly enough to address the profound damage caused. They also say the lawyers' fees are too high. Many also note First Nations and Inuit claimants were included, but Métis survivors were not.

It now seems the process — rather than the agreement itself — is causing the most anger

As the hearing progressed, survivors grew increasingly frustrated. From the start, some called the security "overkill," referring to multiple units of armed police, undercover officers and other security.

With survivors sitting in the gallery, many of them teary or clutching handwritten notes, two lawyers and Shore spoke until the lunch break on that first day.

They had no more chance to speak...

Judge Shore needed to return to his dinner at the hotel & join his friends for more drinks & coffee...
END..

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